object

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ob·ject

(ob'jekt),
1. Anything to which thought or action is directed.
2. In psychoanalysis, that through which an instinct can achieve its aim.
3. In psychoanalysis, often used synonymously with person.

object

[ob′jəkt]
(in psychology) something through which an instinct can achieve its goal; in psychoanalytic terms, a person other than self. See also object relations.

OBJECT

Urology A clinical trial–Overactive Bladder: Judging Effective Control and Treatment

ob·ject

(ob'jekt)
1. Anything to which thought or action is directed.
2. In psychoanalysis, that through which an instinct can achieve its aim.
3. In psychoanalysis, often used synonymously with person.

Object 

1. Something that has a fixed shape or form that you can touch or see.
2. Anything from which an image is formed by an optical system.
extended o. An object consisting of many point objects separated laterally to form a certain shape (e.g. trees, people). See beam of light; pencil of light; extended source.
o. plane See object plane.
point o. A small component of an extended object, in relation to an optical system. If the point object is situated on the axis of an optical system it gives rise to the axial ray and it is referred to as the axial point object.
real o. 
An object from which emergent rays diverge.
o. of regard See point of fixation.
o. space See image space.
virtual o. One towards which incident rays are converging after refraction or reflection. Example: a positive lens forms an image of an object placed beyond its anterior focal point. Introducing a mirror between the lens and the image makes that image become a virtual object. See virtual image.
References in periodicals archive ?
In an essay written to accompany the play, Mears states: "To read some of the accounts of conscientious objectors being grilled and investigated by their Local Tribunals (once conscription had been brought in, in 1916), to assess whether their conscientious objection was genuine and whether therefore they might be exempted from military service, would provoke laughter and derision were the accounts not true.
The Imperial War Museums (IWM) have revealed letters, photographs, cartoons and posters which explore the harsh treatment of conscientious objectors in the two world wars as they took a stand against conscription into the armed forces.
But it isn't just the mess that is annoying residents, with objectors also complaining of rowdy youths.
Many conscientious objectors, such as Quakers, were given non-combatant service roles doing things like working on ambulances.
A CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR WAS REQUIRED to register for the draft, complete a questionnaire, and have his request for IV-E status ruled on by his local draft board.
Another sort of divide, between patriots and conscientious objectors, has received less attention from historians.
One extreme objector regularly told his patients that their situation did not meet the legal criteria for abortion, regardless of their reasons for seeking one.
On Thursday relatives and descendants of the 16,000 gathered in London to mark International Conscientious Objectors Day, an annual event with a special significance in the centenary year of the war's outbreak.
Sandra Spruce of Sutton Parish Council put questions during proceedings Environmental objector Professor Andrew Basden
CND Cymru and Cynefin y Werin organised a day in the Temple of Peace at Cathays Park, Cardiff, to remember those brave conscientious objectors, past and present, who acted on their deepest moral convictions and refused to kill their fellow human beings.
While serving in Iraq with the 320th Military Police Company of the US Army, Aidan Delgado's newfound adherence to Buddhism and his witness of abuses at Abu Ghraib led him to apply for and receive conscientious objector status and to later become an active participant in the anti-war movement.
Ko is thought to be the first Catholic to publicly seek conscientious objector status.