object

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ob·ject

(ob'jekt),
1. Anything to which thought or action is directed.
2. In psychoanalysis, that through which an instinct can achieve its aim.
3. In psychoanalysis, often used synonymously with person.

object

[ob′jəkt]
(in psychology) something through which an instinct can achieve its goal; in psychoanalytic terms, a person other than self. See also object relations.

OBJECT

Urology A clinical trial–Overactive Bladder: Judging Effective Control and Treatment

ob·ject

(ob'jekt)
1. Anything to which thought or action is directed.
2. In psychoanalysis, that through which an instinct can achieve its aim.
3. In psychoanalysis, often used synonymously with person.

Object 

1. Something that has a fixed shape or form that you can touch or see.
2. Anything from which an image is formed by an optical system.
extended o. An object consisting of many point objects separated laterally to form a certain shape (e.g. trees, people). See beam of light; pencil of light; extended source.
o. plane See object plane.
point o. A small component of an extended object, in relation to an optical system. If the point object is situated on the axis of an optical system it gives rise to the axial ray and it is referred to as the axial point object.
real o. 
An object from which emergent rays diverge.
o. of regard See point of fixation.
o. space See image space.
virtual o. One towards which incident rays are converging after refraction or reflection. Example: a positive lens forms an image of an object placed beyond its anterior focal point. Introducing a mirror between the lens and the image makes that image become a virtual object. See virtual image.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conscientious objectors fell into three categories: "alternativists", who were prepared to undertake alternative civilian work, not under any military control; "non-combatants", who would accept the call-up on the condition of having a non-combat role in the army; and "absolutists", who believed that any alternative service supported the war effort.
On Thursday relatives and descendants of the 16,000 gathered in London to mark International Conscientious Objectors Day, an annual event with a special significance in the centenary year of the war's outbreak.
The only ones who actually live in the area are three residents of Kelvin Grove, which is the only street the objectors have ever been concerned with.
Such a case, unprecedented in the north, means that for the first time the Turkish-run Turkish Cypriot military has been forced to acknowledge the existence of conscientious objectors who refuse to do compulsory military service.
Crisis of Conscience closes with a chapter that paints a picture of the objector in Canadian society.
The Texas-born son of a Muslim father and a Christian mother, Abdo said his relatives and wife stand by his decision and added that he will likely refuse to deploy if his application for conscientious objector status is denied.
Despite a tradition of exemption for those who belonged to pacifist religious groups, those who were of no religion, non-traditional religion, or even simply of a non-pacifist faith were generally denied conscientious objector status.
Brock shows how the objectors often filled the role of "other," upon which societies at different times have read their own hopes or fears.
During calendar years 2002 through 2006, the active and reserve components reported processing 425 applications for conscientious objector status.
I read with great interest Stacia Brown's article on conscientious objectors in the military ("Valor, Honor, Conscience," September-October 2006).
In a nutshell: A conscientious objector in Nazi Germany gives his life - unintriguingly - for his beliefs.
Kevin Ramirez, coordinator for the Central Committee for Conscientious Objectors, a group that advises and supports those in the military seeking the conscientious objector status, long ago accepted the business of the military's recruiting.