object

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ob·ject

(ob'jekt),
1. Anything to which thought or action is directed.
2. In psychoanalysis, that through which an instinct can achieve its aim.
3. In psychoanalysis, often used synonymously with person.

object

[ob′jəkt]
(in psychology) something through which an instinct can achieve its goal; in psychoanalytic terms, a person other than self. See also object relations.

OBJECT

Urology A clinical trial–Overactive Bladder: Judging Effective Control and Treatment

ob·ject

(ob'jekt)
1. Anything to which thought or action is directed.
2. In psychoanalysis, that through which an instinct can achieve its aim.
3. In psychoanalysis, often used synonymously with person.

Object 

1. Something that has a fixed shape or form that you can touch or see.
2. Anything from which an image is formed by an optical system.
extended o. An object consisting of many point objects separated laterally to form a certain shape (e.g. trees, people). See beam of light; pencil of light; extended source.
o. plane See object plane.
point o. A small component of an extended object, in relation to an optical system. If the point object is situated on the axis of an optical system it gives rise to the axial ray and it is referred to as the axial point object.
real o. 
An object from which emergent rays diverge.
o. of regard See point of fixation.
o. space See image space.
virtual o. One towards which incident rays are converging after refraction or reflection. Example: a positive lens forms an image of an object placed beyond its anterior focal point. Introducing a mirror between the lens and the image makes that image become a virtual object. See virtual image.
References in periodicals archive ?
In an essay written to accompany the play, Mears states: "To read some of the accounts of conscientious objectors being grilled and investigated by their Local Tribunals (once conscription had been brought in, in 1916), to assess whether their conscientious objection was genuine and whether therefore they might be exempted from military service, would provoke laughter and derision were the accounts not true.
The Imperial War Museums (IWM) have revealed letters, photographs, cartoons and posters which explore the harsh treatment of conscientious objectors in the two world wars as they took a stand against conscription into the armed forces.
But it isn't just the mess that is annoying residents, with objectors also complaining of rowdy youths.
Many conscientious objectors, such as Quakers, were given non-combatant service roles doing things like working on ambulances.
Just because a man was a conscientious objector didn't necessarily mean he wouldn't serve at all.
Yesterday's proceedings were overseen by Piet Dorflinger, a delegate from the European Bureau for Conscientious Objectors (EBCO), an organisation seeking to enshrine the rights of conscientious objectors worldwide.
Another sort of divide, between patriots and conscientious objectors, has received less attention from historians.
Burt Odelson, the lead attorney for the objectors, who, I was told, refused to use a microphone, could barely be heard.
17) The second is that commentators have invariably noted the paucity of examples of practice or judicial decisions supporting the persistent objector rule, and with it the Mandatory View.
The Texas-born son of a Muslim father and a Christian mother, Abdo said his relatives and wife stand by his decision and added that he will likely refuse to deploy if his application for conscientious objector status is denied.
11) In April 1997, Hanna submitted her application for the HPSP scholarship, stating affirmatively that she was not a conscientious objector.
Because although Aguayo met many of the requirements of a conscientious objector according to military policy, he failed to meet one important non-official requirement: his belief system wasn't Christian.