objective

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Related to objectivizing: objectivity, Objectivation, objectified, objectifying

objective

 [ob-jek´tiv]
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a clear, concise declarative statement that directs action toward a specific goal.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.
achromatic objective one in which the chromatic aberration is corrected for two colors and the spherical aberration for one color.
affective objective a statement of expectations regarding changes in attitude or feelings.
apochromatic objective one in which chromatic aberration is corrected for three colors and the spherical aberration for two colors.
behavioral objective a written statement identifying an action or pattern of actions to be expected after an intervention.
cognitive objective a statement of expectations regarding knowledge.
flat field objective a microscopic objective that provides an image in which all parts of the field are simultaneously in focus.
immersion objective one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
psychomotor objective a statement of expectations regarding the acquisition of skills.

ob·jec·tive

(ob-jek'tiv),
1. The lens or lenses in the object end of the body tube of a microscope, by means of which the rays coming from the object examined are brought to a focus. Synonym(s): object glass
2. Viewing events or phenomena as they exist in the external world, impersonally, or in an unprejudiced way; open to observation by oneself and by others. Compare: subjective.
[L. ob- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

/ob·jec·tive/ (ob-jek´tiv)
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a result for whose achievement an effort is made.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope (or telescope) nearest the object that is being examined.

objective

(əb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Based on observable phenomena; empirical.
2. Relating to or being an indicator of disease, such as a physical sign, laboratory test, or x-ray, that can be observed or verified by someone other than the person being evaluated.

ob·jec′tive·ness n.

objective

[əbjek′tiv]
Etymology: L, objectare, to set against
1 n, a goal.
2 adj, pertaining to a phenomenon or clinical finding that is observed; not subjective. An objective finding is often described in health care as a sign that can be seen, heard, felt, or measured.

objective

EBM
A generic term referring to the central reason for performing a trial, which is to answer scientific questions by analysing data collected during the trial.
The primary objective is the main question to be answered and drives any statistical planning for the trial—e.g., calculating the sample size to provide the appropriate power for statistical testing; secondary objectives are goals of a trial that will provide further information on the use of the treatment.

objective

adjective Referring to the perception of external events or phenomena in an impartial, impersonal, and unbiased fashion noun Vox populi A goal; the reason for doing a thing. See Treatment objective.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
1. The lens or lenses in the lower end of the body tube of a microscope.
2. Pertaining to facts, conditions, or phenomena as they actually exist, without distortion by personal viewpoint or prejudice; open to observation by oneself and by others.
Compare: subjective
3. A goal, as in a desired outcome of treatment.
4. A component of a SOAP note format of medical records.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

The lens in a microscope nearest to the object being examined.

objective,

adj easily observed and measured such that psychological and subjective factors have little influence on measurement.

Objective 

An optical system or a lens used to provide a real image of an object. In cameras this image is situated on the film but in viewing instruments (telescopes, microscopes, etc.) this image is seen through an eyepiece. Syn. objective lens. See numerical aperture.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
Lens or lenses in object end of the body tube of a microscope by means of which rays coming from object examined are brought to a focus.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.

immersion objective
one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
References in periodicals archive ?
For Rorty, Proust can become free to the extent that he frees himself from the objectivizing descriptions of others.
the sociologist) can only hope to make his most inevitable interventions acceptable at the cost of the writing work that is essential to conciliate doubly contradictory objectives: to reveal all the elements necessary for the objective analysis of the position of the person questioned and for the understanding of his attitudes, without establishing with him the objectivizing distance that would reduce him to the state of entomological curiosity; to adopt a viewpoint as close as possible to his without, however, projecting oneself unduly into this alter ego who always remains, whether one likes it or not, an object, in order to make oneself abusively the subject of the latter's world view.
Nor can the questioner forget that in objectivizing the interviewee, he objectivizes himself .
Which sometimes does not prevent the most objectivizing discourse in psychiatric observation from performing an imperceptible u-turn back to its default position, the one that describes symptoms (and not their presumed cause).
Such objectivizing or substantialist thinking is typical of the metaphysical tradition because substance appears to be just the sort of thing that can come to presence--be self-evident--in the temporal present.
In this way, mathematical-scientific statements appear as surrogates for objectivizing effects--the opposite of Badiou's 'subjectiving effect' (23)--which destabilize and undermine the position of subjects qua subjects.
But, far removed from this work of weaving and text (from the Latin verb 'texo' to weave), it appears that nowadays we are seeing a so-called 'scientific' pressure on mental illness, a pressure which in fact is mechanistic and objectivizing, and this conception is dismissive of the interweaving that in our jargon we call psychotic transference.
Basing your thinking on three reference points is an effective way of relativizing and objectivizing one of the three viewpoints, your own included: this is the method I have called triangulating cultures, on the model of the procedure used in geodesics.