objective

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objective

 [ob-jek´tiv]
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a clear, concise declarative statement that directs action toward a specific goal.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.
achromatic objective one in which the chromatic aberration is corrected for two colors and the spherical aberration for one color.
affective objective a statement of expectations regarding changes in attitude or feelings.
apochromatic objective one in which chromatic aberration is corrected for three colors and the spherical aberration for two colors.
behavioral objective a written statement identifying an action or pattern of actions to be expected after an intervention.
cognitive objective a statement of expectations regarding knowledge.
flat field objective a microscopic objective that provides an image in which all parts of the field are simultaneously in focus.
immersion objective one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
psychomotor objective a statement of expectations regarding the acquisition of skills.

ob·jec·tive

(ob-jek'tiv),
1. The lens or lenses in the object end of the body tube of a microscope, by means of which the rays coming from the object examined are brought to a focus. Synonym(s): object glass
2. Viewing events or phenomena as they exist in the external world, impersonally, or in an unprejudiced way; open to observation by oneself and by others. Compare: subjective.
[L. ob- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

(əb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Based on observable phenomena; empirical.
2. Relating to or being an indicator of disease, such as a physical sign, laboratory test, or x-ray, that can be observed or verified by someone other than the person being evaluated.

ob·jec′tive·ness n.

objective

EBM
A generic term referring to the central reason for performing a trial, which is to answer scientific questions by analysing data collected during the trial.
The primary objective is the main question to be answered and drives any statistical planning for the trial—e.g., calculating the sample size to provide the appropriate power for statistical testing; secondary objectives are goals of a trial that will provide further information on the use of the treatment.

objective

adjective Referring to the perception of external events or phenomena in an impartial, impersonal, and unbiased fashion noun Vox populi A goal; the reason for doing a thing. See Treatment objective.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
1. The lens or lenses in the lower end of the body tube of a microscope.
2. Pertaining to facts, conditions, or phenomena as they actually exist, without distortion by personal viewpoint or prejudice; open to observation by oneself and by others.
Compare: subjective
3. A goal, as in a desired outcome of treatment.
4. A component of a SOAP note format of medical records.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

The lens in a microscope nearest to the object being examined.

Objective 

An optical system or a lens used to provide a real image of an object. In cameras this image is situated on the film but in viewing instruments (telescopes, microscopes, etc.) this image is seen through an eyepiece. Syn. objective lens. See numerical aperture.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
Lens or lenses in object end of the body tube of a microscope by means of which rays coming from object examined are brought to a focus.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]
References in periodicals archive ?
No objectivization, no representation of the subjective in this sense is possible, since any representation is objective.
He is a role-model to all of us who think of economics as economic science and who try to follow his example of precise thinking and his quest for the "objectivization of knowledge".
The most general reason is that Cassirer conceives symbolic forms as "different directions of objectivization" and writes, while discussing Natorp's polydimensionality of the spiritual world: "The difference between the fields of spiritual meaning is a specific difference, not a quantitative difference....
The success of the scientific attitude had been based on the exactness of its sciences, going beyond the merely intuitive and limited empirical procedure that characterized pre-modern Aristotelian science to reach a kind of exactness that is a true unity, "a true revolution in the technical control of nature." (4) But this exactness is not to be confused with positivist reductionist objectivization, which is but a misunderstanding of science as a derailment of the ideal of a humanistic science.
As long as the thinking of a Peter Singer (philosopher), a Bob Edwards (embryologist), or a Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes (40) predominates over what to do about "defects" in the scientific and public sphere, the nondisabled must stand with and for people with disabilities against continued marginalization through objectivization, infantilization, euthanasia, and abortion, and worse.
This was something that happened gradually with the increasing objectivization (to use Gordon's term) or depersonalization of the idea of the market.
Based on a brief clinical exchange with an African patient, in which the man who discovered the equations of quantum mechanics had a role, the author draws on the work of Schrodinger with its warnings not to give in to objectivization when we are struggling for meaning.
While critics of this novel have associated this sense of (physical) change primarily with the objectivization of the protagonist, it is also necessary to consider the central position occupied by this element of discursivity in the development of an emerging subjectivity in the character of Lucrecia as well.
He sees a parallel between the objectivization of production and the impersonal, detail-focused methodology of modern sciences.
It is in this way that the participant objectivization that Bourdieu talks about can be understood.
However, the process of objectivization of a literary text in Kis's opus began in the middle of his career, with the writing of Hourglass, the last novel from "The Family Cycle." It is in this work that Kis makes a dramatic leap into a postmodern sensibility that at the time was busy experimenting with such formal aspects of a literary text as fragmentation, open-endedness, intertextuality, and multiple points of view.
The book consists of two major parts of three chapters apiece which are framed between: an introduction, which succinctly explains the primacy of the phenomenological dimension of depth, which concerns the distance between ourselves and things prior to any quantitative or inferential objectivization of experience; and a conclusion, which deals with some of the ethical implications stemming from our phenomenological construction of space.