objective

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objective

 [ob-jek´tiv]
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a clear, concise declarative statement that directs action toward a specific goal.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.
achromatic objective one in which the chromatic aberration is corrected for two colors and the spherical aberration for one color.
affective objective a statement of expectations regarding changes in attitude or feelings.
apochromatic objective one in which chromatic aberration is corrected for three colors and the spherical aberration for two colors.
behavioral objective a written statement identifying an action or pattern of actions to be expected after an intervention.
cognitive objective a statement of expectations regarding knowledge.
flat field objective a microscopic objective that provides an image in which all parts of the field are simultaneously in focus.
immersion objective one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
psychomotor objective a statement of expectations regarding the acquisition of skills.

ob·jec·tive

(ob-jek'tiv),
1. The lens or lenses in the object end of the body tube of a microscope, by means of which the rays coming from the object examined are brought to a focus. Synonym(s): object glass
2. Viewing events or phenomena as they exist in the external world, impersonally, or in an unprejudiced way; open to observation by oneself and by others. Compare: subjective.
[L. ob- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

(əb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Based on observable phenomena; empirical.
2. Relating to or being an indicator of disease, such as a physical sign, laboratory test, or x-ray, that can be observed or verified by someone other than the person being evaluated.

ob·jec′tive·ness n.

objective

EBM
A generic term referring to the central reason for performing a trial, which is to answer scientific questions by analysing data collected during the trial.
The primary objective is the main question to be answered and drives any statistical planning for the trial—e.g., calculating the sample size to provide the appropriate power for statistical testing; secondary objectives are goals of a trial that will provide further information on the use of the treatment.

objective

adjective Referring to the perception of external events or phenomena in an impartial, impersonal, and unbiased fashion noun Vox populi A goal; the reason for doing a thing. See Treatment objective.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
1. The lens or lenses in the lower end of the body tube of a microscope.
2. Pertaining to facts, conditions, or phenomena as they actually exist, without distortion by personal viewpoint or prejudice; open to observation by oneself and by others.
Compare: subjective
3. A goal, as in a desired outcome of treatment.
4. A component of a SOAP note format of medical records.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

The lens in a microscope nearest to the object being examined.

Objective 

An optical system or a lens used to provide a real image of an object. In cameras this image is situated on the film but in viewing instruments (telescopes, microscopes, etc.) this image is seen through an eyepiece. Syn. objective lens. See numerical aperture.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
Lens or lenses in object end of the body tube of a microscope by means of which rays coming from object examined are brought to a focus.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]
References in periodicals archive ?
But, it is clear that this kind of integration cannot take place unless there is a level of western objectivisation of the Yoruba traditional medicine; because for two things to be so integrated, they must have some similar properties.
The attempts to showcase the development in the Yoruba herbal medicine through these Traditional Herbal and Medicine Trade Fair in most part of the country is commendable and lends credence to the fact that the 'objectivisation of a kind' is actually possible.
Insofar as the human subject is an objectivisation of the will, and represents themselves as an objectification of the will, the turning against oneself steers the subject away from disappointment.
In Heidegger's view: 'twentieth-century technology is historically the most advanced form of Western metaphysics' as a result of the fact that technology has brought objectivisation of thought to its historical extreme.