objective

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objective

 [ob-jek´tiv]
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a clear, concise declarative statement that directs action toward a specific goal.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.
achromatic objective one in which the chromatic aberration is corrected for two colors and the spherical aberration for one color.
affective objective a statement of expectations regarding changes in attitude or feelings.
apochromatic objective one in which chromatic aberration is corrected for three colors and the spherical aberration for two colors.
behavioral objective a written statement identifying an action or pattern of actions to be expected after an intervention.
cognitive objective a statement of expectations regarding knowledge.
flat field objective a microscopic objective that provides an image in which all parts of the field are simultaneously in focus.
immersion objective one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
psychomotor objective a statement of expectations regarding the acquisition of skills.

ob·jec·tive

(ob-jek'tiv),
1. The lens or lenses in the object end of the body tube of a microscope, by means of which the rays coming from the object examined are brought to a focus. Synonym(s): object glass
2. Viewing events or phenomena as they exist in the external world, impersonally, or in an unprejudiced way; open to observation by oneself and by others. Compare: subjective.
[L. ob- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

/ob·jec·tive/ (ob-jek´tiv)
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a result for whose achievement an effort is made.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope (or telescope) nearest the object that is being examined.

objective

(əb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Based on observable phenomena; empirical.
2. Relating to or being an indicator of disease, such as a physical sign, laboratory test, or x-ray, that can be observed or verified by someone other than the person being evaluated.

ob·jec′tive·ness n.

objective

[əbjek′tiv]
Etymology: L, objectare, to set against
1 n, a goal.
2 adj, pertaining to a phenomenon or clinical finding that is observed; not subjective. An objective finding is often described in health care as a sign that can be seen, heard, felt, or measured.

objective

EBM
A generic term referring to the central reason for performing a trial, which is to answer scientific questions by analysing data collected during the trial.
The primary objective is the main question to be answered and drives any statistical planning for the trial—e.g., calculating the sample size to provide the appropriate power for statistical testing; secondary objectives are goals of a trial that will provide further information on the use of the treatment.

objective

adjective Referring to the perception of external events or phenomena in an impartial, impersonal, and unbiased fashion noun Vox populi A goal; the reason for doing a thing. See Treatment objective.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
1. The lens or lenses in the lower end of the body tube of a microscope.
2. Pertaining to facts, conditions, or phenomena as they actually exist, without distortion by personal viewpoint or prejudice; open to observation by oneself and by others.
Compare: subjective
3. A goal, as in a desired outcome of treatment.
4. A component of a SOAP note format of medical records.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

The lens in a microscope nearest to the object being examined.

objective,

adj easily observed and measured such that psychological and subjective factors have little influence on measurement.

Objective 

An optical system or a lens used to provide a real image of an object. In cameras this image is situated on the film but in viewing instruments (telescopes, microscopes, etc.) this image is seen through an eyepiece. Syn. objective lens. See numerical aperture.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
Lens or lenses in object end of the body tube of a microscope by means of which rays coming from object examined are brought to a focus.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.

immersion objective
one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, the 6th Circuit says the only question is whether the statement in question was objectively false or not.
lt;/pre> <p>Thus, sales tax will not apply to a transaction where, looking objectively at the entire transaction, the transaction is principally the provision of a service, even though tangible personal property is exchanged incidentally.
This simple method of controlled displacement provides the yoghurt manufacturer with a way of objectively analysing the core characteristic of gel set strength, providing a unique means to optimise product formulation and ensure consistent product quality.
Additionally, whether a person is objectively or subjectively self-aware, OSA theory contends that whatever is the focus of attention in any given situation will draw causal attributions (i.
Fredrick,(14) the Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled that where a suspect agent has an objectively reasonable belief that failure to answer questions will cause him to lose his job, his statement in response to the questions is "compelled" under Garrity.
A recent study funded by the National MS Society provides evidence that this symptom can be measured objectively and points to a link between MS and mental fatigue.
A new report indicates that most states have mandated teaching about religion objectively in social studies classes.
All 17 boys also were given a computer test that uses an infrared motion analysis system to objectively measure activity, movement and attention.
In conciliation, for example, the BBB helps facilitate communication between the two conflicting parties--the customer and the business--by objectively sharing their viewpoints.
Then he must ask if the death was an objectively foreseeable result of the deceased's actions; did he realize the danger of his actions and deliberately assume the risk, or was his death caused by an unexpected event?
These form the backbone of the organization's alignment with the company's strategic plan and policies, because they provide appropriate definitions and standards to objectively measure the extent to which each employee is behaving in ways consistent with company policies.
In addition, Kotch said he faithfully reports on Castaic agency business objectively.