objective

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objective

 [ob-jek´tiv]
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a clear, concise declarative statement that directs action toward a specific goal.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.
achromatic objective one in which the chromatic aberration is corrected for two colors and the spherical aberration for one color.
affective objective a statement of expectations regarding changes in attitude or feelings.
apochromatic objective one in which chromatic aberration is corrected for three colors and the spherical aberration for two colors.
behavioral objective a written statement identifying an action or pattern of actions to be expected after an intervention.
cognitive objective a statement of expectations regarding knowledge.
flat field objective a microscopic objective that provides an image in which all parts of the field are simultaneously in focus.
immersion objective one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
psychomotor objective a statement of expectations regarding the acquisition of skills.

ob·jec·tive

(ob-jek'tiv),
1. The lens or lenses in the object end of the body tube of a microscope, by means of which the rays coming from the object examined are brought to a focus. Synonym(s): object glass
2. Viewing events or phenomena as they exist in the external world, impersonally, or in an unprejudiced way; open to observation by oneself and by others. Compare: subjective.
[L. ob- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

/ob·jec·tive/ (ob-jek´tiv)
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a result for whose achievement an effort is made.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope (or telescope) nearest the object that is being examined.

objective

(əb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Based on observable phenomena; empirical.
2. Relating to or being an indicator of disease, such as a physical sign, laboratory test, or x-ray, that can be observed or verified by someone other than the person being evaluated.

ob·jec′tive·ness n.

objective

[əbjek′tiv]
Etymology: L, objectare, to set against
1 n, a goal.
2 adj, pertaining to a phenomenon or clinical finding that is observed; not subjective. An objective finding is often described in health care as a sign that can be seen, heard, felt, or measured.

objective

EBM
A generic term referring to the central reason for performing a trial, which is to answer scientific questions by analysing data collected during the trial.
The primary objective is the main question to be answered and drives any statistical planning for the trial—e.g., calculating the sample size to provide the appropriate power for statistical testing; secondary objectives are goals of a trial that will provide further information on the use of the treatment.

objective

adjective Referring to the perception of external events or phenomena in an impartial, impersonal, and unbiased fashion noun Vox populi A goal; the reason for doing a thing. See Treatment objective.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
1. The lens or lenses in the lower end of the body tube of a microscope.
2. Pertaining to facts, conditions, or phenomena as they actually exist, without distortion by personal viewpoint or prejudice; open to observation by oneself and by others.
Compare: subjective
3. A goal, as in a desired outcome of treatment.
4. A component of a SOAP note format of medical records.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

The lens in a microscope nearest to the object being examined.

objective,

adj easily observed and measured such that psychological and subjective factors have little influence on measurement.

Objective 

An optical system or a lens used to provide a real image of an object. In cameras this image is situated on the film but in viewing instruments (telescopes, microscopes, etc.) this image is seen through an eyepiece. Syn. objective lens. See numerical aperture.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
Lens or lenses in object end of the body tube of a microscope by means of which rays coming from object examined are brought to a focus.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.

immersion objective
one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
References in periodicals archive ?
The EFA test, an FDA Class II medical device, enables employers and occupational health clinics to objectively diagnose and identify the location, extent, nature and age of soft tissue injuries of the back, neck, shoulder, and extremities, including repetitive strain injuries.
It's about whether the law cares only if a statement was objectively false, or is it relevant that the speaker believed the objectively false statement to be true at the time he or she made it?
In order for an employer to objectively justify a set retirement age for employees, s/he needs to show that they were acting to further a legitimate aim of the business and that their actions to achieve that aim were proportionate.
We would certainly look at any proposal put forward by the WRU objectively," said chief executive Stephen Reardon.
Dr Henri Tuomilehto, who took the study, said: "Only 62 per cent of those who lost between 11 and 33lb were objectively cured, as were 38 per cent of those who lost between zero and 11lb.
In Response to Kenneth Nahigian's stimulating essay on objectivity in his column, "Philosophically Speaking," (May/June 2008), human beings exist just as objectively as rocks or trees do.
The tribunals have shown that compulsory retirement can be objectively justified, but there are hurdles to overcome.
Discriminate directly against you - to treat you less favourably than others because of your age unless objectively justified;
The tax adviser believes he or she can objectively perform services for the affected parties, despite the conflict.
This is not a claim that all "pro-choice" advocates are inherently evil, but they do approve of and many seek to advance a position that is clearly objectively evil.
Pope John Paul II told a group of priests on March 1, 1997 that "Contraception is to be judged objectively so profoundly unlawful as never to be, for any reason, justified.