objective

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objective

 [ob-jek´tiv]
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a clear, concise declarative statement that directs action toward a specific goal.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.
achromatic objective one in which the chromatic aberration is corrected for two colors and the spherical aberration for one color.
affective objective a statement of expectations regarding changes in attitude or feelings.
apochromatic objective one in which chromatic aberration is corrected for three colors and the spherical aberration for two colors.
behavioral objective a written statement identifying an action or pattern of actions to be expected after an intervention.
cognitive objective a statement of expectations regarding knowledge.
flat field objective a microscopic objective that provides an image in which all parts of the field are simultaneously in focus.
immersion objective one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
psychomotor objective a statement of expectations regarding the acquisition of skills.

ob·jec·tive

(ob-jek'tiv),
1. The lens or lenses in the object end of the body tube of a microscope, by means of which the rays coming from the object examined are brought to a focus. Synonym(s): object glass
2. Viewing events or phenomena as they exist in the external world, impersonally, or in an unprejudiced way; open to observation by oneself and by others. Compare: subjective.
[L. ob- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

/ob·jec·tive/ (ob-jek´tiv)
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a result for whose achievement an effort is made.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope (or telescope) nearest the object that is being examined.

objective

(əb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Based on observable phenomena; empirical.
2. Relating to or being an indicator of disease, such as a physical sign, laboratory test, or x-ray, that can be observed or verified by someone other than the person being evaluated.

ob·jec′tive·ness n.

objective

[əbjek′tiv]
Etymology: L, objectare, to set against
1 n, a goal.
2 adj, pertaining to a phenomenon or clinical finding that is observed; not subjective. An objective finding is often described in health care as a sign that can be seen, heard, felt, or measured.

objective

EBM
A generic term referring to the central reason for performing a trial, which is to answer scientific questions by analysing data collected during the trial.
The primary objective is the main question to be answered and drives any statistical planning for the trial—e.g., calculating the sample size to provide the appropriate power for statistical testing; secondary objectives are goals of a trial that will provide further information on the use of the treatment.

objective

adjective Referring to the perception of external events or phenomena in an impartial, impersonal, and unbiased fashion noun Vox populi A goal; the reason for doing a thing. See Treatment objective.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
1. The lens or lenses in the lower end of the body tube of a microscope.
2. Pertaining to facts, conditions, or phenomena as they actually exist, without distortion by personal viewpoint or prejudice; open to observation by oneself and by others.
Compare: subjective
3. A goal, as in a desired outcome of treatment.
4. A component of a SOAP note format of medical records.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

The lens in a microscope nearest to the object being examined.

objective,

adj easily observed and measured such that psychological and subjective factors have little influence on measurement.

Objective 

An optical system or a lens used to provide a real image of an object. In cameras this image is situated on the film but in viewing instruments (telescopes, microscopes, etc.) this image is seen through an eyepiece. Syn. objective lens. See numerical aperture.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
Lens or lenses in object end of the body tube of a microscope by means of which rays coming from object examined are brought to a focus.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]

objective

1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.

immersion objective
one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
References in periodicals archive ?
4") achromatic, multi-coated objective lenses and BAK-4 prisms, which provide phenomenal edge to edge image definition and outstanding color fidelity.
The latest market data for this research include: - Overall objective lens market size, 2007-2018 - Objective lens market size by product segment, 2007-2018 - Growth rates of the overall objective lens market and different product segments, 2007-2018 - Shares of different product segments of the overall objective lens market, 2007, 2013 and 2018 - Market Potential Rates of the overall objective lens market and different product segments The product segments analyzed in the data reports include: Objective lenses for cameras and projectors Other objective lenses The reports answer the following questions: - What is the current size of the objective lens market in the world and in different countries?
Cometron 12x70 binoculars feature massive 70mm objective lenses, multi-coated optics, and a large exit pupil for incredible light-gathering capabilities that showcase comets, stars, the craters of the Moon, and even dim nebulae in crisp clarity with high contrast.
Both microscopes have the Auto Link Zoom feature, which automatically adjusts to maintain the same field of view when switching objective lenses, supporting seamless viewing at different scales.
5X magnification and 43mm objective lenses, which means you can leave the spotting scope in the truck.
Appendices include a glossary and data pertaining to electromagnetic spectrum, fluorescence microscopy filters and excitation/emission spectra, safe operation of a fluorescence microscope, microscope objective lenses, and cautions.
The system's binocular tubes, objective lenses, handles, and vibration-free microscope arm can be customized to suit a surgeon's working preferences and specializations.
The DuraScan can have up to a six-position automatic turret with multiple indenters and objective lenses, eliminating the need for manual exchange, consequently reducing frequent recalibration of the machine.
The new Nikon Monarch X binocular series with 45mm objective lenses provide larger exit pupils for increased low light performance, while maintaining the balance and comparable weight of many competitors' 42mm models.
Furthermore, high numerical aperture objective lenses maximize illumination efficiency and long-life dimmable LED surface and sub-stage illumination.
Always adjust the eye span knob(s) midway before inserting the objective lenses first into the foam inserts of the carrying case.
A variety of objective lenses, multipliers, oblique viewers, photo attachments and mounting options are available to increase flexibility.