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ob·ject

(ob'jekt),
1. Anything to which thought or action is directed.
2. In psychoanalysis, that through which an instinct can achieve its aim.
3. In psychoanalysis, often used synonymously with person.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

OBJECT

Urology A clinical trial–Overactive Bladder: Judging Effective Control and Treatment
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ob·ject

(ob'jekt)
1. Anything to which thought or action is directed.
2. In psychoanalysis, that through which an instinct can achieve its aim.
3. In psychoanalysis, often used synonymously with person.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Object 

1. Something that has a fixed shape or form that you can touch or see.
2. Anything from which an image is formed by an optical system.
extended o. An object consisting of many point objects separated laterally to form a certain shape (e.g. trees, people). See beam of light; pencil of light; extended source.
o. plane See object plane.
point o. A small component of an extended object, in relation to an optical system. If the point object is situated on the axis of an optical system it gives rise to the axial ray and it is referred to as the axial point object.
real o. 
An object from which emergent rays diverge.
o. of regard See point of fixation.
o. space See image space.
virtual o. One towards which incident rays are converging after refraction or reflection. Example: a positive lens forms an image of an object placed beyond its anterior focal point. Introducing a mirror between the lens and the image makes that image become a virtual object. See virtual image.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
Although I think Blake is surely correct to argue that such policies objectionably harm certain current members, there must be more to the story of why such policies are wrong.
legally required but objectionably early release of dangerous criminals.
781, 792 (1989) (holding that a prohibition against objectionably loud speech is content-neutral because it restricts the volume of all speech, whether it is rock music or a nursery rhyme).
Lacking any objectionably content, 90 Miles to Havana is a well-written story inspired by true events.
Hobhouse clearly employs this conception of social rights, albeit in an objectionably gendered way, when he writes that: 'It is not for the State to feed, clothe and house [citizens].
Misconception: Caulks and sealants often shrink objectionably.
State Security agents in the Academy of Science, in all public broadcasters, the Church; infiltrated in some, most and in a few cases all card-carrying members of political parties, on newspapers, in youth organisations, associations of architects, actuaries, artists, basket-weavers, brewers and bricklayers and, most objectionably for 007, golf clubs.
without making it a continuous apology," Stephen goes on to accuse Sterne of having "a want of principle," calls him "a consummate sneak," a "patronage hunter" and "servile flatterer," and even insinuates an objectionably "close alliance" with his boon companion, John Hall-Stevenson-the friend whom Woolf more idyllically portrays as Sterne's fellow book lover at Cambridge in her essay "Sterne" (134-7).
For the uninitiated, black-powder shooting is objectionably smelly and dirty.
Churchill taxed Macaulay with having "vilified Marlborough's early life in order by contrast to make the glories of his great period stand out more vividly." Ancestor worship is no doubt an honorable impulse, but in writing Marlborough: His Life and Times (1933-1938), Churchill had no compunction about serving up a cartoon historiography far more objectionably strident than anything ever perpetrated by his intended target.
While this may be framed as paternalistic in a sense, it is not objectionably so.
For instance, I've often heard the criticism that ingredients in Indian food are 'overcooked', a word that's objectionably ethnocentric, no matter where you're from.