objection


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objection

 [ob-jek´shun]
opposition, or a reason for opposition.
References in classic literature ?
"I admit," said he -- when I mentioned to him this objection -- "I admit the truth of your critic's facts, but I deny his conclusions.
"I understood that there were some very strong objections against the lady."
Your uncle was wrong to state his objections so roundly and inconsiderately as he did.
These are the points of view from which we should consider and answer the objections raised by the critics.
Were it proposed by the plan of the convention to abolish the governments of the particular States, its adversaries would have some ground for their objection; though it would not be difficult to show that if they were abolished the general government would be compelled, by the principle of self-preservation, to reinstate them in their proper jurisdiction.
A woman bent on her marriage is a woman who can meet the objections of the whole world, single-handed, and refute them all.
When your choice is fixed so that no objection can be made to it, then I can promise you a ready and cheerful consent; but it is my duty to oppose a match which deep art only could render possible, and must in the end make wretched.
In the end, the good man was satisfied that his nephew, far from having any objections to Sophia, had that esteem for her, which in sober and virtuous minds is the sure foundation of friendship and love.
My heart was beating so fast, and there was such a singing in my ears, that I could scarcely stammer I had no objection.
As to those who are banished, or infamous, there may be the same objections made and the same answer given.
"Though with your usual anxiety for our happiness," said Elinor, "you have been obviating every impediment to the present scheme which occurred to you, there is still one objection which, in my opinion, cannot be so easily removed."
Langeron's objections were valid but it was obvious that their chief aim was to show General Weyrother- who had read his dispositions with as much self-confidence as if he were addressing school children- that he had to do, not with fools, but with men who could teach him something in military matters.