necrology

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necrology

 [nĕ-krol´o-je, ne-krol´o-je]
statistics or records of death. adj., adj necrolog´ic.

ne·crol·o·gy

(nĕ-krol'ŏ-jē),
The science of the collection, classification, and interpretation of mortality statistics.
[necro- + G. logos, study]

necrology

(1) An obituary notice;
(2) A list of deaths.

ne·crol·o·gy

(nĕ-krol'ŏ-jē)
The science of the collection, classification, and interpretation of mortality statistics.
[necro- + G. logos, study]
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References in periodicals archive ?
'It (the obituary) is exactly her voice,' Hicks' son Brian said in an interview with the newspaper.
One user reacted to the obituary saying: "Do the right thing.
But look what prevails.' There isn't a person who can read who isn't moved by this obituary.''
Later, the Times dropped the beef stroganoff reference and changed the lede of the online obituary to:
"One other consideration is the degree of difficulty an obituary might present if we were forced to write it on deadline.
Some weeks ago The Examiner lost another of its former journalists, Will Venters, but on this occasion we were able to run an obituary that he had penned himself in anticipation of the day it would be needed.
On Thursday, HRC and CAR called on the paper to change its obituary policy of not including the names of unmarried couples in obituaries.
Tawney concerning the notice of Eileen Power, Keynes wrote: 'the obituary section of the Journal is rather ambitious and probably remains the most permanent record of the personalities and accomplishments of the economists of our time ...' (Keynes 1993, p.
Boston, MA, May 26, 2010 --(PR.com)-- Tributes.com, the online resource for local and national obituary news and multimedia tributes, today announced a nationwide initiative with over 75 television station partners to implement a co-branded Memorial Day program.
An obituary is not necessarily an idealized encapsulation of a life.
For generations obituary notices in newspapers and magazines soberly noted the passing of the newsworthy--statesmen plutocrats and other pillars of the community along with famous entertainers artists socialites and the like--summing up their subjects' lives in a factual decorous way.