obesity-related disease

obesity-related disease

Clinical nutrition Any condition linked in part to obesity–eg, cardiovascular disease, gallbladder disease–cholecystitis, cholelithiasis, gout, adverse lipid profile, ↑ post-operative complications–poor wound healing, insulin resistance, HTN, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, abnormal GI transit, colorectal CA, strokes, PE, poor wound healing, atelectasis, hepatic steatosis/fibrosis, psychologic disorders. See Obesity.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
* To correct an article on body mass index in Fridays Healthy You special section, if your waist measurement is less than half your height, youre likely not at risk for obesity-related disease. A 6-foot/72-inch-tall man should have no more than a 36-inch waist.
A person with a BMI of 25 to 29.9 is considered overweight; a person with BMI of 30 to 39.9 is considered obese and a person with BMI of 40 or more, or a BMI of 35 or more with an obesity-related disease such as diabetes, heart disease or sleep apnea is considered morbidly obese.
In July, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study found that the costs of treating obesity-related disease may have climbed as high as $147 billion in 2008--almost 10% of all total U.S.
Each fat measuring tool tells you one thing in relation to the others, and by triangulating the data a picture emerges of your overall health, fitness level, and risk of overweight or obesity-related disease.
There is no doubt that poverty is associated with higher levels of obesity, as well as obesity-related disease, in the United States.
"But we do think that we might be able to create a useful therapeutic using CGA that will help those at risk for obesity-related disease as they make positive lifestyle changes."
In their paper, the scientists wrote: "Our findings support emerging evidence that the childhood obesity epidemic may lead to substantial problems of obesity-related disease much sooner in children and young people's lives than previously expected.
The researchers noted that obesity-related disease is the second leading cause of preventable death.
One-third of American adults are obese, and obesity-related disease is the second leading cause of preventable death, the authors say.
Her four-yearold child is also overweight; she has a morbidly obese brother, and her father died of an obesity-related disease.
Total body fat loss in the supplement group was 6%, leading the authors to conclude that "because a 5% reduction of body fat mass has been shown to reduce the risk of obesity-related disease, the results have practical significance."