obesogenic

(redirected from obesigenic)
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obesogenic

adjective
(1) Causing obesity.
(2) Conducive to obesity.

obesogenic

(ŏ-bēs″ŏ-jen′ik) [ obes(ity) + -genic]
Tending to promote or contribute to obesity. It is said of unhealthy, calorie-rich diets and sedentary behavior.
obesogenicity (-jĕ-nis′ĭt-ē)

obesogenic

Anything that promotes obesity. Possible obesogenic factors include excessive food intake, lack of exercise, insufficient sleep, antipsychotic drugs, late pregnancy and some environmental pollutants.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Overwhelming evidence of biologic predisposing factors appears to set this ethnic population up for failure in an environment that offers them seemingly little recourse to an "obesigenic" culture.
It is clear, however, that obesity is partly genetically determined, although these genetic and physiological influences must interact with an "obesigenic" environment (discussed below) to produce the epidemic levels of obesity seen today (Loos & Rankinen, 2005; Ravussin & Bogardus, 2000).
This so-called "toxic" or "obesigenic" environment is thought to provide a powerful set of contingencies that drive energy intake up, energy expenditure down, and make it extremely difficult to engage in effective weight loss and weight maintenance behaviors (Brownell & Horgan, 2003; Henderson & Brownell, 2004; Horgan & Brownell, 2002; Peters, Wyatt, Donahoo, & Hill, 2002; Poston & Foreyt, 1999).
In addition to the need for more research about parental knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and skills about food and nutrition, environmental interventions to combat the increasing effects of our obesigenic Western society are obviously required and long overdue.
Is maternal psychopathology related to obesigenic feeding practices at 1 year?
Elder, "Development and validation of a scale to measure Latino parenting strategies related to children's obesigenic behaviors: the parenting strategies for eating and activity scale (PEAS)," Appetite, vol.
Recent research has demonstrated that sleep apnea, even in healthful weight people, is obesigenic. (2) Apnea even predisposes children ages two to four years to adult obesity.
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with dietary obstacles such as sweet cravings, obesigenic fertility medications, bulimia nervosa, central adiposity, low cholecystokinin (a satiety peptide), and insulin resistance.