nympholepsy


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nym·pho·lep·sy

(nim'fō-lep'sē),
Demoniac frenzy, especially of an erotic nature.
[nympho- + G. lēpsis, a seizure]

nympholepsy

(nĭm′fō-lĕp″sē) [Gr. nymphe, a maiden, + lepsis, a seizure]
1. Frenzied ecstasy, usually erotic in nature.
2. Obsession for something that is unattainable.
References in periodicals archive ?
(8) His amusing period of self-commitment yields a providential diagnosis that he reads in his chart: "'potentially homosexual' and 'totally impotent.'" Having successfully hidden his nympholepsy, he gleefully signs himself out and arranges to return to work--"I mean my scholarly exertions" (35)--while boarding with a New England family with a preadolescent daughter.
The reference to "the dream of Thucydides" in "Nympholepsy" suggests the height of Athenian classical civilization, and the total effect is an image of the polls, the city-state, as Gabriele Gutting has pointed out in The Function of Geographical and Historical Facts in William Faulkner's Fictional Picture of the Deep South (54).
"Nympholepsy" especially is an early indication that Faulkner's fictional perspective and thus his fictional world is centered on a fictional place modeled not only after the bustling commercial and legal center that the county seat town of Oxford represented, but also to some degree on the academic village of the University of Mississippi.
Uses "hen" as a metaphor for Faulkner's women characters in "Episode," "Jealousy," "Nympholepsy," "Frankie and Johnny," "The Priest," "Two Dollar Wife," "Adolescence," "Miss Zilphia Gant," "Idyll in the Desert," and "Evangeline." Women in these stories exist "as hens, protected, surrounded by boundaries that act as fence and restrictions," but are, also like hens, prone to disobey the rules which govern their confinement.