nutrient

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nutrient

 [noo´tre-ent]
1. nourishing; aiding nutrition.
2. a food or biochemical substance used by the body that must be supplied in adequate amounts from foods consumed. There are six classes of nutrients: water, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, minerals, and vitamins.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt),
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

nutrient

(no͞o′trē-ənt, nyo͞o′-)
n.
A source of nourishment, especially a nourishing ingredient in a food.
adj.
Providing nourishment.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

nutrient

Food industry
A substance added to foods that increases their vitamin, mineral and/or protein content.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

nutrient

Food industry A substance added to foods to ↑ vitamin, mineral and protein content Nutrition A general term for proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals, necessary for growth and maintenance of life. See Food additive, Macronutrient, Micronutrient.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

nutrient

Anything that nourishes. Any physiologically valuable ingredient in food.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

nutrient

any material that organisms take in and assimilate for growth and maintenance.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Nutrient

A food substance that provides energy or is necessary for growth and repair. Examples of nutrients are vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
Constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
While much work has been done to elucidate nutrient requirements of adult dogs and cats at maintenance, a paucity of information exists with regard to the role of nutrient precursors or requirements in exercising animals.
He said the exact nutrient requirements for a milking buffaloes still need to be worked out.
In their research they designed nutrient rich meal plans in order to meet nutrient requirements without excess calories.
Other topics include proteins and amino acids, water, models for estimating nutrient requirements of swine, food contaminants, the digestibility of nutrients and energy, and nutrient requirements tables.
Nutritional status tends to decline and nutrient requirements tend to increase with advancing age.
Nutrient budget for reproductive hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) on the Texas coastal prairie (Randolph et al., 1995) and nutrient requirements for pregnant or lactating laboratory rats (National Research Council, 1995) are provided for comparison.
This book also contains eight appendixes: dosages, herbal medicines for pregnancy and lactation, nutrient requirements, nutrient sources, assessments and examinations, symbols and abbreviations, laboratory reference values, and interactions.
and Canadian governments to the IOM to assess current data on the benefits of calcium and vitamin D, as well as to update these nutrient requirements.
* Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) - is the average daily intake level sufficient to meet nutrient requirements of almost all healthy individuals.
of Illinois, Urbana) and scientists at Proctor & Gamble Pet Care, Ohio, draw on recent research to introduce the basic principles of nutrition, the specific nutrient requirements of these companion animals, and feeding and disease management tips at all life stages (e.g., for obesity, diabetes, cancer).