nutrient

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nutrient

 [noo´tre-ent]
1. nourishing; aiding nutrition.
2. a food or biochemical substance used by the body that must be supplied in adequate amounts from foods consumed. There are six classes of nutrients: water, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, minerals, and vitamins.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt),
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

nutrient

(no͞o′trē-ənt, nyo͞o′-)
n.
A source of nourishment, especially a nourishing ingredient in a food.
adj.
Providing nourishment.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

nutrient

Food industry
A substance added to foods that increases their vitamin, mineral and/or protein content.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

nutrient

Food industry A substance added to foods to ↑ vitamin, mineral and protein content Nutrition A general term for proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals, necessary for growth and maintenance of life. See Food additive, Macronutrient, Micronutrient.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

nutrient

Anything that nourishes. Any physiologically valuable ingredient in food.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

nutrient

any material that organisms take in and assimilate for growth and maintenance.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Nutrient

A food substance that provides energy or is necessary for growth and repair. Examples of nutrients are vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
Constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of alfalfa stage of maturity and cutting time on FT/IR carbohydrate and lignin molecular structures and relationship with wet chemical nutrient profile
Pet foods that meet these requirements have a statement on the packaging that they have either been formulated based on the AAFCO nutrient profiles or tested via AAFCO feeding trials.
Further, inoculation of KCC-32 in IRG silage enhanced the quality and nutrient profile. Subsequently, KCC-32 produced high amount of lactic acid in MRS growth medium as well as silage preparation.
Few seeds can match the nutrient profile of hemp seeds as a rich source of the omega-3 precursor ALA and hard-to-find beneficial GLA.
According to Mark Mueller, Botanic Innovations founder, "Red Zinfandel Grape Seed Oil does have similar nutrient profiles to other types of grape seed oil, but specifying the grape type gives marketers good options to highlight ingredients more effectively."
(2.) Nutrient profile of 1 fluid ounce cow milk compared with 1 fluid ounce human breast milk was taken from First Data Bank Nutritionist IV Diet Analysis software program.
She concluded that how a food makes us feel is more complex than its nutrient profile alone.
This new generation of nutrition symbols and ratings--which I shall refer to collectively as nutrient profile labeling--is a complex phenomenon that encompasses a variety of different types of label claims.
Mark Walpole comments: "The ingredient has three main marketing angles: its nutrient profile, its connection with health through the association with the health benefits of red wine, and the sheer romance of having a Cabernet bread or a Champagne cracker."
These are groupings of foods with a general commonality of nutrient profile. In Australia, the commonly used food groups (so-called core food groups) are a cereals/grains-based group (breads, cereals, rice, pasta, noodles), a milk-based group (milk, yoghurt, cheese), fruits, vegetables and legumes, and a group sometimes termed meats and alternatives (meat, fish, poultry, eggs, nuts, legumes).
However, the current text specifies that nutrition claims (but not health claims) shall be allowed on foods that contain a single nutrient (fat, saturated fat, trans fat, sugars or sodium) in excess of the nutrient profile amount, if the claim is accompanied by a disclaimer regarding the undesired nutrient.