nutrient

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nutrient

 [noo´tre-ent]
1. nourishing; aiding nutrition.
2. a food or biochemical substance used by the body that must be supplied in adequate amounts from foods consumed. There are six classes of nutrients: water, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, minerals, and vitamins.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt),
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]

nutrient

/nu·tri·ent/ (noo´tre-int)
1. nourishing; providing nutrition.
2. a food or other substance that provides energy or building material for the survival and growth of a living organism.

nutrient

(no͞o′trē-ənt, nyo͞o′-)
n.
A source of nourishment, especially a nourishing ingredient in a food.
adj.
Providing nourishment.

nutrient

[no̅o̅′trē·ənt]
Etymology: L, nutriens, food that nourishes
a chemical substance that provides nourishment and affects the nutritive and metabolic processes of the body. Nutrients are essential for growth, reproduction, and maintenance of health.

nutrient

Food industry
A substance added to foods that increases their vitamin, mineral and/or protein content.

nutrient

Food industry A substance added to foods to ↑ vitamin, mineral and protein content Nutrition A general term for proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals, necessary for growth and maintenance of life. See Food additive, Macronutrient, Micronutrient.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]

nutrient

Anything that nourishes. Any physiologically valuable ingredient in food.

nutrient

any material that organisms take in and assimilate for growth and maintenance.

Nutrient

A food substance that provides energy or is necessary for growth and repair. Examples of nutrients are vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

nutrient

a component of food that can be used to provide energy and/or in the synthesis of substances necessary for metabolism, growth and repair, and for all physiological functions (e.g. coenzymes, hormones, haemoglobin). See also macronutrients, micronutrients, minerals, vitamins; appendix 4.1-4.4 .

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
Constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]

nutrient,

n the beneficial chemical in foods and beverages. Classified as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, water, vitamins, and minerals.

nutrient

1. nourishing; aiding nutrition.
2. a nourishing substance, food or component of food. Includes minerals, vitamins, fats, protein, carbohydrate and water.

nutrient allowance
the total feed provided to an animal for a day. Includes its basic nutritional requirements plus allowances for waste in the feeding process, special allowances for special states and activities, and for special qualities of the feed being used.
nutrient analysis
chemical analysis of feedstuff with measurement of fiber, protein, fat, carbohydrate, individual minerals and vitamins.
nutrient artery
one of the arterial blood supplies to a typical long bone; enters the bone via an oblique canal. Other blood supply routes to bone include metaphyseal, epiphyseal and periosteal arteries.
nutrient content
the proportion of a feed or diet that is digestible and assimilable. See also total digestible nutrients.
nutrient profile
a listing of the optimal level of each nutrient in dog and cat foods; published by the Association of American Feed Control Officials.
nutrient requirements
daily requirement for each nutrient for each animal species at the recognized stages of life and production; usually presented in feeding tables.
nutrient veins
mimics the nutrient artery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pet foods that meet these requirements have a statement on the packaging that they have either been formulated based on the AAFCO nutrient profiles or tested via AAFCO feeding trials.
A second limitation, related to the first, was the use of the USDA's composite nutrient profiles for food groups when no other information was available.
Aside from First Amendment concerns, my proposal to regulate nutrient profile labeling under the existing regulatory framework for nutrient content claims faces several other potential objections.
The controversy concerns the question whether or not food manufacturers should be obliged to present nutrient profiles, stating the fat, sugar and salt content of a product, within 18 months of registration, in order to be allowed to market their product as healthy.
Used to reduce redundant lab testing, databases are a great tool in closely matching the nutrient profile of a finished product.
The article introduces compulsory nutrient profiles for all foods that carry nutrition or health claims.
We contract only with analysts who use scientifically validated food-analysis methods, which enable us to ensure that an accurate nutrient profile exists for each type of food item.
Nutrient profiles that define the basic criteria that food should comply with in order to be considered suitable for a health claim are being established, based on scientific advice from EFSA.
The food claims proposal caused a lot of trouble when it went through Parliament in the first reading: the EP tried to scrap the nutrient profiles from the Regulation and pushed for a less stringent notification procedure, but this was overturned by the Health Ministers in June in a move which was welcomed by the Commission.
The nutrient profiles generated can then be printed directly from the web page.
When the new European Nutrient Profile legislation is introduced in 2009, it will ensure that in order to make on-pack claims such as 'source of fibre' or 'low in cholesterol', each product will have to contain a specific amount per portion.
The only exception is Britain, where the absurdity of the 100g measure at the heart of the Nutrient Profile Model means such reformulations make not a blind bit of difference.