nutrient


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

nutrient

 [noo´tre-ent]
1. nourishing; aiding nutrition.
2. a food or biochemical substance used by the body that must be supplied in adequate amounts from foods consumed. There are six classes of nutrients: water, proteins, carbohydrates, fats, minerals, and vitamins.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt),
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

nutrient

(no͞o′trē-ənt, nyo͞o′-)
n.
A source of nourishment, especially a nourishing ingredient in a food.
adj.
Providing nourishment.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

nutrient

Food industry
A substance added to foods that increases their vitamin, mineral and/or protein content.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

nutrient

Food industry A substance added to foods to ↑ vitamin, mineral and protein content Nutrition A general term for proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals, necessary for growth and maintenance of life. See Food additive, Macronutrient, Micronutrient.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
A constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

nutrient

Anything that nourishes. Any physiologically valuable ingredient in food.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

nutrient

any material that organisms take in and assimilate for growth and maintenance.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Nutrient

A food substance that provides energy or is necessary for growth and repair. Examples of nutrients are vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

nu·tri·ent

(nū'trē-ĕnt)
Constituent of food necessary for normal physiologic function.
[L. nutriens, fr. nutrio, to nourish]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
* It must possess nutrient levels and ratios (for the nutrients in the AAFCO Nutrient Profiles) that meet or exceed the levels and ratios found in the lead product, and must not exceed the maximums established by the Nutrient Profiles.
Number: With the help of magnifying hand lens, all surfaces and each border were thoroughly examined from proximal to distal end to calculate the total number of nutrient foramina in each bone.
The soil solution lies at the center of vineyard mineral nutrient action: It is the water and dissolved substances that reside in soil pores.
Other nanoparticles synthesized from non-mineral nutrients have also revealed positive effects on plants.
Tolerance upper intake level, or upper limit, which shows the limit to how much of a nutrient can one take in.
For more about nutrient management for garden crops, see this fact sheet:
Onpackage marketing highlighted nutritional attributes such as immune support and antioxidant properties, and some made claims related to specific nutrients.
A University of Florida study discovered that people who consumed more plant-based foods and, in turn, higher amounts of nutrients, such as phytochemicals and minerals, maintained healthier body weights and experienced less internal inflammation linked to chronic diseases than people with lower intakes of nutrient-dense foods, even though both groups took in about the same number of daily calories.
Another new consumer-oriented upgrade allows users to look up the amount of a specific nutrient within any one of the database's thousands of food items.
There is currently a nutrient removal market, not a recovery market but this is set to change.
For less than the cost of a bottle of a multi-vitamin supplement, my patients can really benefit by learning the potential side effects of their medications." Begert, discovered the benefits of the Nutrient Depletions app when his own physician alerted him to his low blood calcium levels.