nurture

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nurture

(nûr′chər)
n.
a. The action of raising or caring for offspring: the nurture of an infant.
b. Biology The sum of environmental influences and conditions acting on an organism, especially in contrast to heredity.
c. The fostering or overseeing of the development of something: the nurture of an idea.

nur′tur·er n.

nurture

[nur′chər]
to feed, rear, foster, or care for, such as in the nourishment, care, and training of growing children.
References in periodicals archive ?
One week of fasting and seclusion is undertaken when the fish nurturer is keen on cultivating the fish from their earliest growth stages.
They argued that most men are physically stronger and therefore better suited for certain jobs, such as military combat, while women bear children and are better nurturers.
Historically, mammy images have represented black women as asexual nurturers, said Judy Dozier, who chairs the African-American Studies program at Lake Forest College.
One thing they all agree on is that even though their mothers were the nurturers, their fathers' "tough love" paid off.
And don't go looking to your husbands for sympathy about life's daily hassles, the authors caution, since men shouldn't be expected to be good nurturers.
Black women have always been the nurturers in the family and the backbone of passing on the faith tradition to the young," says Sister Patricia Chappell, a Sister of Notre Dame de Namur and president of the sisters' conference.
However, a growing number of investigators, including some formerly ardent evolutionary-tree nurturers now suspect that the branching cladistic creations suffer from conceptual root rot.
The feminist movement is "hurtful to women" because it encourages them to give up their natural roles as mothers, homemakers and nurturers, a top staff member with Focus on the Family asserted recently.
Not because I want to thwart any ambitions she might have to take up such an important and worthwhile job as nursing, but because I think it might be healthier for society in general if men realised women aren't always natural nurturers.
While women are empowered in their roles as mothers, nurturers, and protectors of sons, they are excoriated in roles laying claim to leadership or authority.
They are no doubt more agalitarian than in the past, but men are still the chief rulers in political, social, and economic affairs and women the chief nurturers at home and at work.

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