nurture

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nurture

(nûr′chər)
n.
a. The action of raising or caring for offspring: the nurture of an infant.
b. Biology The sum of environmental influences and conditions acting on an organism, especially in contrast to heredity.
c. The fostering or overseeing of the development of something: the nurture of an idea.

nur′tur·er n.

nurture

[nur′chər]
to feed, rear, foster, or care for, such as in the nourishment, care, and training of growing children.
References in periodicals archive ?
Babat acknowledges the existence of rivals who might try to challenge the powers and good intentions of the intended nurturer of fish.
The feminist movement is "hurtful to women" because it encourages them to give up their natural roles as mothers, homemakers and nurturers, a top staff member with Focus on the Family asserted recently.
Technical Assistance to Chapters at Risk: Since regions consist of geographically located state chapters the regional organization should be a nurturer to state chapters that are at risk of failure because of under or undevelopment.
A selfless nurturer of human and natural communities is not the mental image that most people--perhaps even we ourselves--have of a forester.
Margaret can no longer be stereotyped --as a malicious conspirator, selfless dynastic nurturer, holy recluse, or paragon surpassing her sex in learning, foresight, or courage.
She concludes that "for African women Jesus Christ is the victorious conqueror of all evil spiritual forces; He is the nurturer of life, and a totality of their being" (p.
th] birthday activities this fall, Earthbound Farm invited people to take a personality quiz that celebrated the personality pillars ("Salad Signs") of its founders, farmers, employees and customers: Innovator, Champion, Nurturer and Explorer.
She was an energetic family nurturer who could always be seen in the kitchen at holiday and family gatherings assuring that things were right for the guests.
However, global engineering students from across the globe have responded to Lenovo s successes over the last year, recognized the company as a nurturer of talent, and have voted to place it amongst the World s Most Attractive Employers ranking it seven positions higher than last year in the Top-50 engineering companies to work for, said Petter Nylander, CEO, Universum.
Where lesbian couples are concerned, the mother who carries the baby and breastfeeds it, is not assumed to be the parent who will stay at home or be the main nurturer.
Famed as a nurturer of young bands, Leckie has brought a powerful clarity to the band's music and Isla is a darker, more mature, expansive statement than their debut Knee Deep In The North Sea.
The role you played as nurturer and protector has gone.

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