nurturance

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nurturance

 [nur´chur-ans]
a fostering of learning, growing, and healing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Much of this has focused on neuropeptides like oxytocin and vasopressin, showing that nurturant interactions increase these hormones in both caregivers and infants (Weisman, Zagoory-Sharon, & Feldman, 2012).
These children are learning vital conceptions that they are worthy of warm consistent attention and that there are people in their environment who can be counted upon to give them just this nurturant, sustaining care.
Brannon, 1976; Thompson & Pleck, 1986; Thompson, Pleck, & Ferrera, 1992), is consistent with the observation that men are more prone than women to anger, violence, risk-taking, and antisocial behaviours in general (these characteristics correlate with scores on the MGRS scale); with women, the focus on being attractive, nurturant, and avoiding confrontation, is consistent with the observation that women are more prone to depression, agoraphobia, and appearance concerns (these characteristics, as well as symptoms of disordered eating, correlate with scores on the FGRS scale; Bekker & Boselie, 2002; Eilser et al.
Gallagher's inability to fuse the aggressive and nurturant parts of his psyche or to merge his disparate needs for safety, security and order, on the one hand; and the drive for sexual excitement, destruction and the orgiastic possibilities within the darker side of disordered experience, on the other, thus appears on the screen not only as a projection of his own subjectivity but also of his culture's split construction of sexual difference.
There is also considerable evidence demonstrating an association between financial strain and less nurturant parenting and, thereby, less optimal child outcomes (Conger et al.
Nurturant environments in childhood and adulthood help promote these beliefs and guard against the ravages of stress.
Inasmuch as they illustrate another way in which inequality can block the development of nurturant relationships, the interactions underscore the central theme of "The Geologist's Maid.
Children who care for small siblings, as is common in many traditional societies, develop more nurturant behaviour, (28) a possible precondition for altruism.
The progressive or nurturant family model, he believes, deserves to be realized in its fullness, while the radical conservative or strict father model is irredeemably warped and destructive.
Within this Nation-as-Family metaphor, conservatives use a Strict Father morality to frame their politics and liberals use a Nurturant Parent model.
In fact, Rolland (1994a) noted that a woman's serious illness can present the greatest overall risk to couples' and family functioning because historically women have served many of the practical and nurturant roles in families.
Blakemore, Children's Nurturant Interactions with Their Infant