nurturance


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nurturance

 [nur´chur-ans]
a fostering of learning, growing, and healing.
References in periodicals archive ?
All 10 participants also mentioned that pet ownership could have a negative impact on the owner's emotional or physical nurturance.
Thus, although career progression, financial reward, and professional status may be to the fore, caring and nurturance motivations also emerge but are often played down by the participants themselves.
In humans, like other mammals, crying elicits parental proximity and nurturance (Zeifman, 2001).
The family system is oriented inward toward nurturance while the business system is oriented outward towards production.
Although men also display feminine values such as nurturance, these traits are not perceived as important for leadership.
Nurturance was assessed with data and included questions such as: How much did she understand your problems and worries and how much time and attention did she give you when you needed it?
01 Table II Educational Aspirations among Adolescents in relation to Home Environment Control Protectiveness Punishment Conformity Social Isolation Reward Deprivation of Privileges Nurturance Rejection 10.
These women provided shelter, education, and nurturance for children whose parents were lost due to illness and tragedies common in early America.
98) found that parenting qualities such as nurturance and consistency were stronger predictors of behavioural development in children than maternal depression.
It is a conundrum that Lexile has great intentions and many good effects; its relationship with Love of Reading has been one of both nurturance and abuse.
Hertzog devotes an entire chapter to young children's social and emotional development, emphasizing the importance of nurturance and how parents can foster prosocial behaviors.
However, we need not wait on healthcare environments to take care of our spiritual nurturance.