nursing ethics


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ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.

nursing ethics

Etymology: L, nutrix, nurse; Gk, ethikos, character
the values or moral principles governing relationships between the nurse and patient, the patient's family, other members of the health professions, and the general public. See also Code for Nurses.

nursing ethics

A system of principles governing the conduct of a nurse. Nursing ethics deals with the relationship of a nurse to the patient, the patient's family, associates and fellow nurses, and society at large.
See: Nightingale Pledge
See also: ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
Noddings, a proponent of a care orientation whose ideas have influenced many writers in nursing ethics, has attacked principle- and rule-based ethics for being abstract rather than concrete.
The iterative development of the conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of nursing ethics from the late 19th century up until the present time, and the implications of these developments for the nursing profession across the globe, have already been comprehensively documented and thus there is nothing to be gained by rehearsing this history here (see Johnstone 2015a, 2015b, 2015c).
They describe nursing ethics as being one part of bioethics, alongside 'medical ethics', 'psychological ethics' and 'environmental ethics'.
BNS president Rula Al Saffar said that Alba occupational nurse and first- aid instructor Ibrahim Al Demestani only acted according to nursing ethics and the country should be proud to have a health professional like him.
Those in attendance experienced continuing education that brought us the latest in knowledge regarding genetics, genomics, organ transplantation, and nursing ethics.
Toward a moral horizon: Nursing ethics for leadership and practice.
Grace (ethics and adult health, Boston College, Massachusetts) focuses consideration of nursing ethics on the specific issues facing advanced practice nurses.
Such issues include: - Cloning - Reproductive technologies - Euthanasia and assisted suicide - Physician-patient relationship - Stem-cell research - Contraception - Nursing ethics - Medical professionalism - Pharmaceutical ethics - Biotechnology ethics - Genetic ethics - Transplantation ethics - Definition of death - Withholding & withdrawal - Aging
The chair of nursing at Melbourne's Deakin University has just edited a Sage Library major reference work, the three-volume Nursing Ethics.
As the American Nurses Association (ANA) embarks on a yearlong campaign to highlight the importance of nursing ethics and their impact on patients and health care quality, the annual Gallup survey on trust in professions shows the public continues to rate nursing as the most honest and ethical.
It is consistent with recommendations from leading nurse academics and ethicists who have called for integrated, flexible, and creative approaches for teaching nursing ethics.
The American Nurses Association considers bullying/horizontal violence a violation of nursing ethics and the Joint Commission issued a Sentinel Event Alert linking the "toxic atmosphere" created by disruptive behavior in health care facilities to preventable adverse patient outcomes.

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