nurse-to-patient ratio

nurse-to-patient ratio

The number of nurses assigned to care for a patient, esp. in a hospital. Low nurse-to-patient ratios have been associated with a decrease in the quality of hospital care and an increase in complications in care.
References in periodicals archive ?
Your nurse-patient assignment process may be dictated by unit layout, patient census, or nurse-to-patient ratio. Most nurses use one of three assignment processes.
Both advocates and opponents of the bills point to California, which in 2004 became the first state to enact nurse-to-patient ratio requirements.
There are understandable fears among the workforce that care could be compromised as a result of this high nurse-to-patient ratio.
But apart from the nurse-to-patient ratio targets, the need for more medical professionals in Seha has arisen from the fact that skills and requirements among nurses are also shifting.
Nurse-to-patient ratio is as high as 1:80-100 while doctor-to-patient ratio has skyrocketed to 1:30,000.
Health Secretary Vaughan Gething unveiled the new facility on Penarth Road which promises to provide improved care and a better nurse-to-patient ratio.
The change needs to be made on a national level to increase both the number of nurses able to practice and the nurse-to-patient ratio. Greater numbers of nurses at the bedside help increase patient satisfaction, improve quality of care, and increase nurse morale, satisfaction, and retention (Stanton, 2004).
"This is to support our domestic recruitment plan to ensure that we have a safe and sustainable nurse-to-patient ratio on our hospital wards.
Mandated minimum nurse-to-patient ratio is the final factor and is indirectly controlled for by the use of the pre and post-study design.
The orthopaedic consultant said quality of care deteriorated if nurses were stretched, and hospitals were running a "false economy" if they chose to have a lower nurse-to-patient ratio.
However, many health care leaders prefer to conceptualize workload as a nurse-to-patient ratio, such as "one nurse for every five patients." Although the way this measure is stated implies that a single nurse has responsibility for a set group of patients, this might not be the case.
The state's 450-plus acute care hospitals were to begin using a 1-to-5 nurse-to-patient ratio this month down from 1-to-6, as part of a law signed in 1999 by then-Gov.