nu

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ν

1. The 13th letter of the Greek alphabet, nu.
3. In chemistry, denotes the position of a substituent located on the thirteenth atom from the carboxyl or other functional group.

nu

(),
Thirteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, ν.

ν

/ν/ (nu, the thirteenth letter of the Greek alphabet) frequency (1).

/℞/ [L.] re (take); see prescription.

nu

[n(y)o̅o̅]
Ν, ν, the thirteenth letter of the Greek alphabet.

nu

()
1. Thirteenth letter of the Greek alphabet (ν).
2. Kinematic viscosity; frequency;stoichiometric number
3. chemistry The position of a substituent located on the thirteenth atom from the carboxyl or other functional group.

Rx, ℞

recipe; used as a heading for a prescription.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reports said the nuns were forcibly taken from their convent, which was about two miles from the city center, by armed men believed to be members of the 'lost command' of the Moro National Liberation Front.
In the introduction to her 2014 book, Dedicated to God: An Oral History of Cloistered Nuns, Reese writes that the call to leave the secular world and embrace a cloistered existence was, for many, quite unexpected: "It defied their God-given temperaments.
Jenny Agutter is currently one of the best-known nuns on the box.
If Nuns Ruled the World is at times fun and inspiring and at other times devastating and dark.
And we pray for those nuns who incorrectly consider the Church teachings backward because it refuses to conform to the relativism that overwhelms our world.
The nuns are now in the custody of General Security and are on their way to Jdaidet Yabouss," General Security chief Maj.
We see the emergence today in Sri Lanka of paired stereotypes: the "corrupt" monk and the "virtuous" nun.
Only two indisputable cases of nuns as scribes are known from medieval England (one, at Syon, discovered by O'Mara herself), and her zealous attempt to add to this number offers a potential three more (Margery Byrkenhed of Chester, Elizabeth Trotter of Ickleton, and Alice Champnys of Shaftesbury), and a fourth for later consideration.
Unlike the Venetian literary nun Arcangela Tarabotti (1604-1652), who used her pen to expose the cruelty of a system that warehoused surplus daughters in convents, the nuns we encounter here took more drastic measures to escape the rigid confines of convent life in early modern Italy.
Melbourne, July 18 (ANI): An Italian nun had to sue her cunning ex-boyfriend after he posted her naked pictures on Facebook, and refused to remove them.
During our conversation, the young nun explained how they take turn to do various chores demanded to keep a nunnery going.