numeral

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numeral

(nū′mĕr-ăl) [L. numerus, number]
1. Denoting or pert. to a number.
2. A conventional symbol expressing a number.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There, a Muslim scholar named Mohammad Bin Mousa Al Khwarizmi developed a mathematical discipline called Al Jabir, which literally means 'reunion of broken parts.' Arabic roots In the early 13th century, an Italian mathematician named Fibonacci, who studied calculation with an Arab master in Muslim North Africa, found the numerals and their decimal system much more practical than the Roman system, and soon popularised them in Europe, where the figures became known as 'Arabic numerals.' Meanwhile, the discipline of Al Jabir became 'algebra,' and Al Khwarizmi's name evolved into 'algorithm.' Today, many words in English have Arabic roots; a shortlist would include admiral, alchemy, alcove, alembic, alkali, almanac, lute, mask, muslin, nadir, sugar, syrup, tariff and zenith.
72% of Republican respondents replied that Arabic numerals should not be taught in US schools.
Our universities have rowing VIIIs, our queen is Elizabeth II, many modern clock faces have Roman numerals, we watch Act II Scene 2 in the theatre and enjoy Chapter IV in a book.
These numerals are stamped on these items by the ministry after being tested in its laboratory and indicate hallmarking.
For example, he uses only uppercase roman numerals to denote chord functionality; for analysis of rock music, which so often employs chords in unexpected ways, it is essential for the reader to know immediately if the chord discussed is III or iii.
Learning to tell time is broken down into manageable lessons as follows: Number to Number Matching with Hour Numerals; Number to Number Matching with Minute Numerals; Filling in the Missing Numbers with Hour Numerals; Filling in the Missing Numbers with Minute Numerals; Reading the Hour and Minute Numerals with the Teaching Hands; Filling in the color-coded "Time Is:"; Reading the Hour and Minute Numerals with the color-coded arrow hands and checking answers with the teaching hands; and Reading the Hour and Minute Numerals with the black clock hands.
This is the case of our common numerals, what are known as Arabic numerals, based as they are on a place-value system shared by the Latin/Roman script, moving from left to right.
The cushion-shaped case, crescent-crown guard, distinctive fonts of the numerals, and gently sloping lugs are all dead giveaways -- you can tell this is a Panerai from a mile away.
Number panel with numerals in ascending font on the top left side and bottom right side
But most analogue watches and clocks have only the numerals from 1 to 12.
It also contains a number panel with numerals growing from small to big on the top left side and bottom right side.