nuisance

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nuisance

Anything that causes inconvenience, annoyance, or disturbance of normal physiology.
References in classic literature ?
Petya and Natasha on the contrary, far from helping their parents, were generally a nuisance and a hindrance to everyone.
"Lucy--Lucy--what a nuisance I am!" protested Miss Bartlett, and followed her across the lawn.
"Well, you know, she's a nuisance herself, Miss Cathy is, she IS so busy, and into everything, like that bird.
You become stupid, restless, and irritable; rude to strangers and dangerous toward your friends; clumsy, maudlin, and quarrelsome; a nuisance to yourself and everybody about you.
He evidently looked upon a case as a case, and anxious relatives as a nuisance which must be treated with firmness.
Harry says that if he'd suspected for half a second she was going to make such a blooming nuisance of herself he'd have seen himself damned before he had anything to do with her."
The ordinance bans from public parks and the downtown area for 90 days, and later for 180 days, individuals found guilty of three nuisances in one year.
With the foregoing, restoring the grandeur of the El Hogar and other dilapidated buildings in our country is the more practical and safer option than waiting for them to wither and become nuisances that threaten the lives and properties of the members of their communities.
The existence of the potential negative health effects of the types of nuisances in both Aldred's Case and Rex v.
The preceding articles have examined many of the different ways society and government have identified and managed urban nuisances in Canada.
Under state law, a board of health has the authority to investigate all nuisances that may harm public health and it can order the owner to remove the source of the nuisance within 24 hours, or within a time the board deems reasonable, at the owner's expense.
By the seventeenth century, Parliament had added to the types of conduct found by the courts to constitute the crime of public nuisance, "thus beginning a pattern of legislative bodies declaring certain activities to be public nuisances that continues to this day." (16) All jurisdictions in the United States subsequently enacted criminal statues covering such nuisances without attempting to define them, "or with at most a very general and rather meaningless definition." (17) "Such statutes commonly are construed to include anything which would have been a public nuisance at common law." (18) Distinctions eventually emerged between public and private nuisances, and they became separate torts.