nudge

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nudge

A term of art referring to a health-promoting philosophy in the UK in which people are incentivised into leading healthier lives by gently pushing them in the right direction with vouchers for healthy living, foods, walking and so on. Some view “nudging” as more effective than “nannying”, in which government attempts to reinforce healthy habits in citizens with regulations and sanctions forunhealthy behaviour or actions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Obama and Cameron helped put nudge economics into mainstream policymaking -- in 2011, the Guardian newspaper described the U.
Maki says the foundation of nudge economics rests on the idea that people are not the rational beings that classical economic theory teaches.
Following a number of recent papers, (7) I define nudges in terms of a policymake 's choice of frame.
When paternalism is understood this way, nudges are paternalistic by definition.
This paper is partly based on a working paper "Nutritional Label Nudges Are Unlikely to Improve Public Health" for the Center for the Study of Economic Liberty.
Nudge theorists argue that consumers often suffer from persistent self-control problems.
There is little reason to suspect that nutritional nudges are immune to similar inadvertent effects on diet behaviors that at least partially overturn policy goals.
Another problem is that these nudges are often based on the conventional wisdom that obesity is linked to over-consumption of fast food, soft drinks, and candy as opposed to food generally.
The survey findings fit with an analysis of a basic principle, which suggests that on grounds of welfare and autonomy, the choice between the two kinds of nudges is not self-evident.
Nudges are interventions that steer people in particular directions but also allow them to go their own way.
literature on nudges is that they represent two of the rare major policy
NUDGES AND EXERCISE COMMITMENT CONTRACTS Suggested length Actual weeks of commitment of exercise (weeks) 8 3.