nudge

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nudge

A term of art referring to a health-promoting philosophy in the UK in which people are incentivised into leading healthier lives by gently pushing them in the right direction with vouchers for healthy living, foods, walking and so on. Some view “nudging” as more effective than “nannying”, in which government attempts to reinforce healthy habits in citizens with regulations and sanctions forunhealthy behaviour or actions.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, absent a theory about when passive acceptance does and does not signal "true" preferences, there is no justification for treating passive acceptance of the nudged choice as evidence of the choice that would have been rationally made absent the nudge.
In sum, for consumers nudged to notice labels, understanding them is the second step in the causal chain of events necessary to improve personal health.
Horel, "Sensitivity of a spectrally filtered and nudged limited-area model to outer model options," Monthly Weather Review, vol.
This is a problem for democracy, because there are no legitimate public procedures for determining which biases should be nudged and which not.
with selecting the option other than the one being nudged toward.
The results were most pronounced for those successfully nudged into the longest contracts.
According to the study, if they nudged the one on the left with their nose they received a sugar pellet reward.
Summary: European shares edged higher on Thursday, with Next among the top risers after the British retailer nudged up its full-year profit forecast.
Amid frustration from supporters that he is still scrambling for signings in mid-August, the Toon boss insisted he has "nudged Mike (Ashley) enough," about it.
The new split divides those who believe the fat, feckless masses should be nudged toward better behavior and those who believe the fat, feckless masses should be nannied toward better behavior.
If this is the case, who is to decide in what areas individuals can be fairly nudged by social engineers?