nucleosome

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nucleosome

 [noo´kle-o-sōm″]
any of the complexes of histone and DNA in eukaryotic cells, seen under the electron microscope as beadlike bodies on a string of DNA.

nu·cle·o·some

(nū'klē-ō-sōm'),
A localized aggregation of histone and DNA that is evident when chromatin is in the uncondensed stage.
Synonym(s): nu body
[nucleo- + G. sōma, body]

nucleosome

/nu·cleo·some/ (-sōm) any of the complexes of histone and DNA in eukaryotic cells, seen under the electron microscope as beadlike bodies on a string of DNA.

nucleosome

(no͞o′klē-ə-sōm′, nyo͞o′-)
n.
Any of the repeating subunits of chromatin found in eukaryotes, consisting of a DNA chain coiled around a core of histones.

nu′cle·o·som′al (-sō′məl) adj.

nucleosome

[no̅o̅′klē·əsōm′]
Etymology: L, nucleus + Gk, soma, body
any one of the repeating DNA-histone complexes that appear as beadlike structures at distinct intervals along a chromosome.

nucleosome

A nucleic acid and protein complex, which is the basic structural unit of chromatin, composed of a segment of DNA wrapped around a core of histone molecules.

nu·cle·o·some

(nū'klē-ō-sōm)
A localized aggregation of histone and DNA that is evident when chromatin is in the uncondensed stage.
[nucleo- + G. sōma, body]

nucleosome

The structural subunit of CHROMATIN consisting of about 200 BASE PAIRS and a barrel-shaped core of eight histone protein molecules (an octamer).

nucleosome

the basic structural unit of the eukaryote chromosome, being composed of four pairs of HISTONE proteins (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4) that are combined to form an octomer around which is wrapped about 150 nucleotide pairs of DNA.

nucleosome

any of the complexes of histone and DNA in eukaryotic cells, seen under the electron microscope as beadlike bodies on a string of DNA.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acetylation of histone H4 plays a primary role in enhancing transcription factor binding to nucleosomal DNA in vitro.
Circulating fragmented nucleosomal DNA and caspase-3 mRNA in patients with lymphoma and myeloma.
This component which maintains its nucleosomal structure has genes which are transcribed and are critical for early embryonic development (HOX and, HSP genes).
These proteins are subdivided into three families by functional sequence motifs that consist of HMGA including AT-hook motif, HMGB including HMG-box motif and HMGN containing nucleosomal binding domain.
Fragmented nucleosomal DNA in plasma resulting from apoptotic death of the tumor cells may also provide an indication for tumor DNA.
Given that DNA methylation is known to influence nucleosomal packing (35), our data suggest that the hypomethylated DNA molecules were less densely packed with histones and were therefore more susceptible to enzymatic degradation.
Supravital exposure to propidium iodide identities apoptotic cells in the absence of nucleosomal DNA fragmentation.
Fetal DNA is apparently in a nucleosomal configuration with a mononucleosomal DNA length of 143 bp, compared with 166 bp for maternal DNA.
This feature might not have been relevant were it not for the observation that cell-free DNA is fragmented, probably into apoptotic nucleosomal fragments, and that fetal cell-free DNA fragments are generally smaller than those of maternal origin (8,9).
Circulating fragmented nucleosomal DNA and aaspase-3 mRNA in patients with lymphoma and myeloma.
A hallmark of apoptosis is DNA degradation, in which chromosomal DNA is 1st cleaved into large fragments (50-300 kb) and subsequently into multiples of nucleosomal units (180-200 bp) (1).