nucleic acid amplification technique

nucleic acid amplification technique

any of various in vitro methods by which a DNA or RNA sequence is amplified, making it more readily detectable for various procedures or tests. The original, and still most commonly used, is the polymerase chain reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
RCA is a highly sensitive nucleic acid amplification technique, which has been used in the detection of DNA, RNA, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and other biological species.
This screening procedure is a justifiable compromise among competing factors: the sensitivities of nucleic acid amplification technique assays, the diagnostic window period, and delay in delivery of the PC supply.
The WNV assay was developed using Gen-Probe's family of technologies, including a unique nucleic acid amplification technique called Transcription-Mediated Amplification (TMA).
The assay utilizes a family of technologies developed by Gen-Probe, including a unique nucleic acid amplification technique called Transcription-Mediated Amplification (TMA).
SDA is another non-PCR nucleic acid amplification technique, developed in 1991 [145, 146].
4 Novel Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques 99 5.
We identified PARV4 in such pools (5), albeit at a lower frequency and titer than parvovirus B19, when parvovirus B19 was not excluded by screening with nucleic acid amplification techniques.
The patented real-time Amplifluor(R) fluorescent detection system is a powerful and flexible platform that can be utilized for a variety of nucleic acid amplification techniques.
The rationale behind immuno-PCR is to develop ultrahigh-sensitivity labels by exploiting the extremely high productivity of nucleic acid amplification techniques, coupled with highly sensitive approaches to detect the amplified material.
The patented technology was invented in the mid-1980's and relates to pathogen detection methods that achieve high clinical sensitivity by coupling Vysis' reversible target capture technology with enzymatic nucleic acid amplification techniques, such as the polymerase chain reaction, Q-beta replicase, and transcription mediated amplification.
Additional testing such as nucleic acid amplification techniques for specified viruses and reverse transcriptase assays for retroviruses should complement nonspecific tests.
Although swab samples placed into viral transport media may allow nucleic acid amplification techniques or culture of non-fastidious agents to be carried out, such specimens are not very conducive to successful rapid electron microscopy diagnosis of lesion exudates because of dilution effects and interfering components.