atomic bomb

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A weapon of mass destruction powered by the fission of the nuclei of heavy atoms—e.g., plutonium-239 or uranium-235—which follows bombardment of the fuel with neutrons, resulting in a chain reaction and release of pressure, heat, light, and radiation

atomic bomb

explosion of a nuclear device.

atomic bomb injury
see radiation injury.
atomic bomb fallout
subsequent to the explosion of an atomic device is the gradual return to earth of radioactive dust.
atomic bomb irradiation
irradiation of animal tissues by any means, therapeutic, accidental, atomic bomb blast.
References in periodicals archive ?
The draft resolution seeks a world free of nuclear weapons and reaffirms the importance of complying with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons.
With over 40 per cent of the world's uranium, Australia has both an opportunity and a responsibility to become a global leader in galvanising international co-operation for a world free from nuclear weapons.
On the contrary, we can deter them (but that's a topic for another day), and, more to the point, we should aim our nuclear deterrence at rogue states--today's most likely source of nuclear weapons for terrorists.
Most authorities in the world believe that India maintains less than one hundred nuclear weapons throughout the country, with the Prime Minister or his "designated successor(s)" holding release authority.
Radioactivity from earth-penetrating nuclear weapons cannot be contained.
First of all, he notes that Iran is, by most accounts, several years away from being able to make even one nuclear weapon.
We regret that instead of complying with this long overdue legal obligation to pursue nuclear disarmament, the military doctrines of some nuclear-weapon states continue to provide for modernization of nuclear weapons, which violates their legal obligations and should therefore be stopped.
Should Israel agree to attend a regional conference, it would be compelled to come clean about its never-confirmed nuclear weapons program (see Lewis 2014)--and thus end the unjustifiable and anachronistic opaqueness that many in the international community have tolerated for decades.
Speaking at the United Nations on the sidelines of a meeting on nuclear arms non-proliferation, he said there absolute numbers of nuclear weapons, worldwide, has decreased, "But the threat posed by nuclear weapons is no less important today than it was during my childhood.

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