atomic bomb

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A weapon of mass destruction powered by the fission of the nuclei of heavy atoms—e.g., plutonium-239 or uranium-235—which follows bombardment of the fuel with neutrons, resulting in a chain reaction and release of pressure, heat, light, and radiation

atomic bomb

explosion of a nuclear device.

atomic bomb injury
see radiation injury.
atomic bomb fallout
subsequent to the explosion of an atomic device is the gradual return to earth of radioactive dust.
atomic bomb irradiation
irradiation of animal tissues by any means, therapeutic, accidental, atomic bomb blast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, ICAN has been the leading civil society actor in the endeavour to achieve a prohibition of nuclear weapons under international law.
Promotion of the International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons is a valuable means in this regard, through which the States demonstrate their political will to pursue the realization of the noble objective of a nuclear-weapon-free world.
The UN approved a draft resolution in late 2009 for an international day against nuclear tests to raise public awareness about the threats and dangers of nuclear weapons.
To put everything into perspective, it should be acknowledged that even before the crisis in Ukraine, the withdrawal of nuclear weapons was opposed by the Eastern European NATO member states, especially the Baltic States.
The Federal Ministry leading the Vienna convention emphasised that nuclear weapons pose an existential threat to all humankind, highlighting that these possible perils are not abstract and real.
Contents Introduction Background The Distinction Between Strategic and Nonstrategic Nuclear Weapons Definition by Observable Capabilities Definition by Exclusion U.
General Assembly for adoption, unlike the New Zealand- or Australia-led statements on the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons prepared to be issued at the First Committee.
This is significant because nuclear weapons are some of the most technologically sophisticated devices in the world.
The Philippines' consistent support for the cause culminated in its 'yes' vote for the adoption of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons last July.
This outcome was the result of a global campaign focused on the unconditional unacceptability of the use of nuclear weapons, the Secretary-General noted, acknowledging the invaluable contribution made by Hiroshima's message of peace and the heroic efforts of hibakushas or survivors of the atomic bombs.
As of early 2017, there are approximately 14,900 nuclear warheads existing worldwide, according to the Federation of American Scientists, an organization dedicated to reducing the number and spread of nuclear weapons.

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