nuclear spin


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nuclear spin

an intrinsic form of angular momentum possessed by atomic nuclei containing an odd number of nucleons (protons or neutrons).

nuclear spin

An MRI term referring to an intrinsic property of nuclei with an odd numbers of protons and/or neutrons to exhibit angular momentum and a magnetic moment; even-numbered nuclei do not produce NMR signals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists believe that any given molecule can transform from ortho- into para- spin states and vice versa, a process known as nuclear spin conversion.
When the sample was held at this cryogenic temperature, the nuclear spins of about 37 percent of the ions - a typical benchmark to measure quantum coherence - remained in their superposition state for three hours.
The nuclear spins of the 10 billion or so phosphorus ions used in this experiment were all placed in the same quantum state.
Using this characteristics, the joint research group has produced and detected entanglement between two quantum bits by treating the nuclear spin of a phosphorus atom as one quantum bit and the captured electron's spin as another quantum bit.
Our approach to neutron polarization relies on the use of nuclear spin polarized [.
An atomic nucleus consists of both protons and neutrons, and the advantage of using the nuclear spin as a qubit is that the nucleus is well protected, and nearly impervious to unwanted electromagnetic disturbance, which is a condition for keeping the sensitive information in the qubit intact.
Nuclear spin relaxation in liquids; theory, experiments, and applications.
e] ([sigma] [equivalent to] electron spin, J [equivalent to] nuclear spin, [p.
University of California at Santa Barbara researchers have developed an NMR technique that uses light to flip nuclear spin states, leading to greater resolution.
This allows a new, versatile approach to nuclear spintronics, namely applying fast optical initialisation to carrier states and subsequent transfer via dynamic nuclear polarisation (DNP) of the spin information onto long-lived nuclear spin states, with promising applications in quantum information science and novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques.
However, some big technical hurdles remain: the nuclear spin storage-and-read-out apparatus works only at 3.