nuclear medicine technologist


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nuclear

 [noo´kle-ar]
pertaining to a nucleus.
nuclear magnetic resonance a phenomenon exhibited by many atomic nuclei: when placed in a constant magnetic field, the nuclei absorb electromagnetic radiation at a few characteristic frequencies. By applying an external magnetic field to a solution in a constant radio frequency field, it is possible to determine the structure of an unknown compound. An application of this technique, called magnetic resonance imaging, permits imaging of soft tissues of the body by distinguishing between hydrogen atoms in different environments.
nuclear medicine technologist a health care professional whose duties include positioning and attending to patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures, operating imaging devices (scintillation cameras and rectilinear scanners) under the direction of the nuclear medicine physician, preparing radiopharmaceuticals for administration to patients, making dose calculations for in vivo procedures, performing quality control procedures, and utilizing a knowledge of radiation physics and radiation safety to minimize the radiation exposure to patients, to the technologist and coworkers, and to the public. There are currently three organizations that certify nuclear medicine technologists: the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT), the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP), and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Individuals certified by the ARRT are designated RT(N)(ARRT); those certified by the ASCP are designated NM(ASCP); and those certified by the NMTCB are designated CNMT.

nuclear medicine technologist

an allied health professional who uses radioactive and stable nuclides to make diagnostic evaluations of the anatomical or physiological conditions of the body and who provides therapy with unsealed radioactive sources. Responsibilities include application of a special knowledge of radiation physics and safety regulations to limit radiation exposure; preparation and administration of radiopharmaceuticals; use of radiation detection devices and other kinds of laboratory equipment that measure the quantity and distribution of radionuclides deposited in a patient specimen; and performance of in vivo and in vitro diagnostic procedures.

nu·cle·ar med·i·cine tech·nol·o·gist

(nū'klē-ăr med'i-sin tek-nol'ŏ-jist)
Someone skilled in injecting and following the course of radioisotopes in the body in the diagnosing of disease.

nuclear

pertaining to a nucleus.

nuclear bag fibers
fibers found in neuromuscular spindles; have an extensive nerve supply.
nuclear chain fibers
fibers, which like nuclear bag fibers, are found in neuromuscular spindles; shorter but more numerous than the bag variety.
nuclear ground substance, nuclear matrix
the matrix substance in a nucleus, surrounded by the limiting membrane.
nuclear imaging
nuclear index
nuclear medicine technologist
see radiological technologist.
nuclear sap
soluble phase of the nuclear matrix.
nuclear veterinary medicine
see nuclear veterinary medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the potential benefit-risk ratio from these nuclear medicine techniques should be well known to the referring clinicians, radiologists, cardiologists, nuclear medicine technologists and to some extent to the patients too [6].
The profession is gender diverse compared with most allied health professions, with the majority of active nuclear medicine technologists being women who are in their mid-40s.
Albuquerque, NM: American Society of Radiologic Technologists and Society of Nuclear Medicine Technologist Section; 2004.
Although the future looks bright for the hybrid technology, a shortage of nuclear medicine technologists could sharply affect the total number of procedures that can be performed.
Mobile PET's services include the PET imaging system and trained nuclear medicine technologists, providing a cost-effective approach to PET for interim or long-term shared services.
The ASRT works with the Society of Nuclear Medicine, which also is interested in standards for nuclear medicine technologists.
2) However, the supply of radiation therapists and nuclear medicine technologists should be adequate.
Mobile PET's services include the PET imaging technology, trained nuclear medicine technologists, and physician over-read service providing a total solution approach to PET for interim, or long term shared services.
If a PET-CT scanner is located in a nuclear medicine department, certified nuclear medicine technologists generally perform these procedures.
In addition to film badges worn at the collar level, nuclear medicine technologists also wear ring badges to measure radiation dose received as a result of handling radioactive materials.
In today's fast-moving and dynamic departments, radiographers, nuclear medicine technologists and radiation therapists alike must be open to changing trends in their chosen professions.

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