nuclear medicine


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medicine

 [med´ĭ-sin]
1. any drug or remedy.
2. the art and science of the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
3. the nonsurgical treatment of disease.
alternative medicine see complementary and alternative medicine.
aviation medicine the branch of medicine that deals with the physiologic, medical, psychologic, and epidemiologic problems involved in flying.
ayurvedic medicine the traditional medicine of India, done according to Hindu scriptures and making use of plants and other healing materials native to India.
behavioral medicine a type of psychosomatic medicine focused on psychological means of influencing physical symptoms, such as biofeedback or relaxation.
clinical medicine
1. the study of disease by direct examination of the living patient.
2. the last two years of the usual curriculum in a medical college.
complementary medicine (complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)) a large and diverse set of systems of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention based on philosophies and techniques other than those used in conventional Western medicine, often derived from traditions of medical practice used in other, non-Western cultures. Such practices may be described as alternative, that is, existing as a body separate from and as a replacement for conventional Western medicine, or complementary, that is, used in addition to conventional Western practice. CAM is characterized by its focus on the whole person as a unique individual, on the energy of the body and its influence on health and disease, on the healing power of nature and the mobilization of the body's own resources to heal itself, and on the treatment of the underlying causes, rather than symptoms, of disease. Many of the techniques used are the subject of controversy and have not been validated by controlled studies.
emergency medicine the medical specialty that deals with the acutely ill or injured who require immediate medical treatment. See also emergency and emergency care.
experimental medicine study of the science of healing diseases based on experimentation in animals.
family medicine family practice.
forensic medicine the application of medical knowledge to questions of law; see also medical jurisprudence. Called also legal medicine.
group medicine the practice of medicine by a group of physicians, usually representing various specialties, who are associated together for the cooperative diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.
internal medicine the medical specialty that deals with diagnosis and medical treatment of diseases and disorders of internal structures of the body.
legal medicine forensic medicine.
nuclear medicine the branch of medicine concerned with the use of radionuclides in diagnosis and treatment of disease.
patent medicine a drug or remedy protected by a trademark, available without a prescription.
physical medicine physiatry.
preclinical medicine the subjects studied in medicine before the student observes actual diseases in patients.
preventive medicine the branch of medical study and practice aimed at preventing disease and promoting health.
proprietary medicine any chemical, drug, or similar preparation used in the treatment of diseases, if such article is protected against free competition as to name, product, composition, or process of manufacture by secrecy, patent, trademark, or copyright, or by other means.
psychosomatic medicine the study of the interrelations between bodily processes and emotional life.
socialized medicine a system of medical care regulated and controlled by the government; called also state medicine.
space medicine the branch of aviation medicine concerned with conditions encountered by human beings in space.
sports medicine the field of medicine concerned with injuries sustained in athletic endeavors, including their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.
state medicine socialized medicine.
travel medicine (travelers' medicine) the subspecialty of tropical medicine consisting of the diagnosis and treatment or prevention of diseases of travelers.
tropical medicine medical science as applied to diseases occurring primarily in the tropics and subtropics.
veterinary medicine the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of animals other than humans.

nu·cle·ar med·i·cine

the clinical discipline concerned with the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radionuclides, including sealed radiation sources.

nuclear medicine

n.
The branch of medicine that deals with the use of radionuclides in diagnosis and treatment of disease.

nuclear medicine

a medical discipline that uses radiation emitted by radioactive isotopes in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Forms of radiation important in nuclear medicine include alpha and beta particles, gamma rays, and x-rays. Radioactive elements used in nuclear medicine, called radionuclides or radiopharmaceuticals, are produced artificially. Radiopharmaceuticals are used as tracers for assessing the structure, function, secretion, excretion, and volume of a particular organ or tissue. They are also used to analyze biological specimens and to treat specific diseases such as thyroid cancer. An important component of nuclear medicine is imaging, which involves administering radiopharmaceuticals to a patient orally, intravenously, or by inhalation to localize a specific organ or system and its structure and function. Scanning instruments convert the radioactive emissions into an image of the organ or system.

nuclear medicine

A clinical discipline that uses radioisotopes to diagnose and treat disease

nu·cle·ar med·i·cine

(nū'klē-ăr med'i-sin)
The clinical discipline concerned with the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radionuclides, excluding the therapeutic use of sealed radiation sources.

nuclear medicine

The medical specialty based on the use of radioactive substances for diagnosis and treatment of disease. Radioactive isotopes can be incorporated into a wide range of compounds that can be given by mouth or by injection. Specific radioactive elements or compounds containing them are selectively concentrated in different organs, or in particular disease tissues, and their distribution and local concentration in the body can then be detected and measured by an instrument called a GAMMA CAMERA. Certain cancers, for instance, can be detected anywhere in the body and appropriate treatment directed to every site of the disease.

Nuclear medicine

A subspecialty of radiology used to show the function and anatomy of body organs. Very small amounts of radioactive substances, or tracers, are detected with a special camera as they accumulate in certain organs and tissues.

medicine

1. any drug or remedy.
2. the nonsurgical treatment of disease.

food animal medicine
the veterinary medicine of the domesticated farm animals, including cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry and, with some flexibility, horses, that are used for and in the production of human food and of fiber used in human raiment. It includes the increasingly important segment of preventive and herd/flock medicine.
nuclear medicine
that branch of veterinary medicine devoted to the use of radionuclides in the diagnosis and treatment of animal diseases.
veterinary medicine
the science and art of diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the diseases of animals, and the maintenance of normal health. This classic definition is now expanded in many areas to include the promotion of financially optimal production. It consists mostly of prevention of wastage caused by disease, but also includes inputs from nutrition, genetics, housing, and other management disciplines. See also veterinary medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
We are very proud that our nuclear medicine solution won the EU-wide tender by Radboud University Medical Center, demonstrating its clear value in an objective way," comments Erik van Rijn, Business Manager Growth Initiatives, EMEA for Agfa Healthcare.
Mallinckrodt, GE Healthcare, Lantheus Medical Imaging and Siemens Healthcare are ahead of other companies and are considered to be leaders in nuclear medicine sector with their marketed products.
However, the Asia-Pacific market is slated to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period and serve as a revenue pocket for the companies offering nuclear medicine equipment.
Medical emergencies require speedy reporting and tele-nuclear medicine can provide this for emergency nuclear medicine studies, as necessary.
Punjab Institute of Nuclear Medicine (PINUM) is a nuclear medicine center in Faisalabad, providing the facilities of nuclear medicine diagnostic techniques.
According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, median annual earnings of nuclear medicine technologists were $62,300 in May 2006, with the highest 10 percent earning more than $82,310.
The book is written with the nuclear medicine technologist in mind and would make a good addition to a department's library.
DOE is also launching an Advanced Nuclear Medicine Initiative.
Last week one of the worlds main suppliers of nuclear medicine, the ageing National Research Universal (NRU) in Canada, ceased routine production of nuclear medicine operations after about 60 years of operation.
This third edition self-assessment aid to preparing for nuclear medicine board reviews is intended to prepare readers for certification or re-certification exams given by the American Board of Radiology, the American Board of Nuclear Medicine, the Certification Board of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board.
It includes specialised functionalities to process, read and report all nuclear medicine, SPECT, PET, and multi-modality images with just the click of a button, from a single workstation.
Around 20,000 patients receive treatment or medical checkups in nuclear medicine facilities here, said a Health official on Tuesday.

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