nuclear magnetic resonance


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Related to nuclear magnetic resonance: Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

nuclear

 [noo´kle-ar]
pertaining to a nucleus.
nuclear magnetic resonance a phenomenon exhibited by many atomic nuclei: when placed in a constant magnetic field, the nuclei absorb electromagnetic radiation at a few characteristic frequencies. By applying an external magnetic field to a solution in a constant radio frequency field, it is possible to determine the structure of an unknown compound. An application of this technique, called magnetic resonance imaging, permits imaging of soft tissues of the body by distinguishing between hydrogen atoms in different environments.
nuclear medicine technologist a health care professional whose duties include positioning and attending to patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures, operating imaging devices (scintillation cameras and rectilinear scanners) under the direction of the nuclear medicine physician, preparing radiopharmaceuticals for administration to patients, making dose calculations for in vivo procedures, performing quality control procedures, and utilizing a knowledge of radiation physics and radiation safety to minimize the radiation exposure to patients, to the technologist and coworkers, and to the public. There are currently three organizations that certify nuclear medicine technologists: the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT), the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP), and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Individuals certified by the ARRT are designated RT(N)(ARRT); those certified by the ASCP are designated NM(ASCP); and those certified by the NMTCB are designated CNMT.

resonance

 [rez´o-nans]
1. the prolongation and intensification of sound produced by transmission of its vibrations to a cavity, especially such a sound elicited by percussion. Decrease of resonance is called dullness; its increase, flatness.
2. a vocal sound heard on auscultation.
amphoric resonance a sound resembling that produced by blowing over the mouth of an empty bottle.
nuclear magnetic resonance see nuclear magnetic resonance.
skodaic resonance increased percussion resonance at the upper part of the chest, with flatness below it; heard over a large pleural effusion or area of consolidation.
tympanic resonance tympanitic resonance (def. 2).
tympanitic resonance
1. the peculiar sound elicited by percussing a tympanitic abdomen.
2. the drumlike reverberation of a cavity full of air; called also tympanic resonance.
vocal resonance (VR) the sound of ordinary speech as heard through the chest wall.

nu·cle·ar mag·net·ic res·o·nance (NMR),

the phenomenon in which certain atomic nuclei possessing a magnetic moment will precess around the axis of a strong external magnetic field, the frequency of precession (Larmor frequency) being specific for each nucleus and the strength of the magnetic field; spinning nuclei induce their own oscillating magnetic fields, and therefore emit electromagnetic radiation that can produce a detectable signal at the Larmor frequency. NMR is used as a method of determining structure and assessing molecular dynamics and is applied clinically in magnetic resonance imaging.

nuclear magnetic resonance

n. Abbr. NMR
The absorption of electromagnetic radiation of a specific frequency by an atomic nucleus placed in a strong magnetic field, used especially to analyze tissues of the body in magnetic resonance imaging.

nuclear magnetic resonance

nuclear magnetic resonance

See Magnetic resonance imaging, NMR.
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Diagnostic NM  
• In vivo–eg injection of radiocontrast to detect an ↑/↓ in local 'signal'–uptake in suspected bone metastases
• In vitro–assays of clinical specimens, eg radio immunoassay–RIA for various hormones, eg human chorionic gonadotropin–β-HCG, insulin, and TSH
Therapeutic NM Radiation oncology Administration of a 'hot' isotope to sterilize a particular area, and prevent malignant cells from growing & dividing
Note: RIAs are being replaced by ELISAs, which are easier to perform, the reagents are more easily stored, and do not have the problems inherent in using and disposing of radioactive waste; nuclear medicine also encompasses in vivo diagnostics in the form of scintillation counters to 'scan' various body regions for the presence of increased uptake of radionuclides, which when focal, implies primary neoplasia or metastases

nu·cle·ar mag·net·ic res·o·nance

(NMR) (nū'klē-ăr mag-net'ik rez'ŏ-năns)
The phenomenon in which certain atomic nuclei possessing a magnetic moment will precess around the axis of a strong external magnetic field, the frequency of precession being specific for each nucleus and the strength of the magnetic field; spinning nuclei induce their own oscillating magnetic fields and therefore emit electromagnetic radiation that can produce a detectable signal. NMR is used as a method of identifying covalent bonds and is applied clinically in magnetic resonance imaging.

nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)

See MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI).

nu·cle·ar mag·net·ic res·o·nance

(NMR) (nū'klē-ăr mag-net'ik rez'ŏ-năns)
The phenomenon in which certain atomic nuclei possessing a magnetic moment will precess around the axis of a strong external magnetic field, the frequency of precession being specific for each nucleus and the strength of the magnetic field; spinning nuclei induce their own oscillating magnetic fields and therefore emit electromagnetic radiation that can produce a detectable signal. NMR is used as a method of identifying covalent bonds and is applied clinically in magnetic resonance imaging

nuclear magnetic resonance,

References in periodicals archive ?
As a stand alone volume, Advances in NMR, comprehensively highlights the rapid progress of nuclear magnetic resonance over the last five years.
On-site Cold Head Service on the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (Varian 7700 CCC Cryobay with Varian 500 MHz Nuclear Magnetic Resonance System (NMR 500-SN41276).
First developed in the late 1940s, nuclear magnetic resonance instruments exploit the magnetic nature of atomic nuclei.
Main features: acquisition of a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer (RMN) permanent magnet for the study of organic molecules in solution
Acquisition of a 500 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer console.
A team of scientists in Brazil has used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to confirm previous work demonstrating a silica gel--amorphous silica bound to water--in rice hulls.
It includes chapters on force/deformation and sound input techniques, near infrared spectroscopy (NIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
Contract awarded for Supply of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance machine dedicated to the diagnostic medical imaging with magnetic field strength of 1.
Researchers have now demonstrated that a novel variant of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging can capture crucial details of a porous rock's structure and elucidate its effect on fluid flow through the material.
Other chapters consider research on potential new technologies, including surface penetrating radar, microwave reflectance, nuclear magnetic resonance, electrical impedance and ultrasound.
Contract notice: Providing a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer wide cavity.
In one offshoot, researchers are using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to probe electrons trapped in semiconducting layers.

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