nuclear family


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family

 [fam´ĭ-le]
1. a group of people related by blood or marriage or a strong common bond, such as those descended from a common ancestor, or a husband, wife, and their children.
2. a taxonomic category below an order and above a genus.
blended family a family unit composed of a married couple and their offspring including some from previous marriages.
dysfunctional family one in which adult caregivers are unable to consistently fulfill their family responsibilities.
extended family a nuclear family and their close relatives, such as the children's grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
nuclear family a family consisting of a two-generation relationship of parents and children, living together and more or less isolated from their extended family.
nuclear dyad family a husband and wife with no children.
family of origin the family in which a person grew up.
family processes the psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual functions and relationships within the family unit; for nursing diagnoses, see under process.
single-parent family a lone parent and offspring living together as a family unit.
skewed family a family in which one spouse is severely dysfunctional and the other spouse assumes an acquiescent, peacemaking stance to maintain equilibrium.
family (omaha) in the omaha system, a problem modifier defined as a social unit or related group of individuals who live together and who experience a health-related problem.

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

in genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.

nuclear family

Global village
See Nuclear club.
 
Social medicine
The core family unit which classically consists of heterosexual male and female partners and their direct genetic progeny; disintegration of this unit and its central role in society is held responsible by some for losses in mental equilibrium.

nuclear family

Social medicine The core family unit, which typically consists of heterosexually-oriented ♂and ♀ partners and their direct–usually unmarried genetic progeny. Cf Companionship, Extended family, Marriage bonus, Most significant other, Social isolation. Cf Single-parent family.

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

(nū'klē-ăr fam'i-lē)
In genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.

Nuclear family

The basic family unit, consisting of father, mother, and their biological children.
Mentioned in: Family Therapy

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

(nū'klē-ăr fam'i-lē)
In genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was based on the literature in Bowen Theory describing marital conflict and distance as a mechanism of nuclear family process (Bowen, 1978; Kerr & Bowen, 1988; Papero, 1990).
The sentiments that characterize the modern nuclear family are those associated with romantic love, maternal love, and domesticity.
A social invention masquerading as evolutionary universal, the traditional nuclear family requires certain myths of origin.
In an analogous way, with the displacement of modern society by its postmodern successor, the nuclear family pattern has been or is currently being displaced by the postmodern family based on some yet undetermined principle (an atomistic individualism perhaps) (Chaland) and manifest in some new sort of pattern yet to be finally characterised.
I was completely unmoved by the flexible multi-position seating, glass roof panels and huge rear hatch opening, just a few of the must-have design developments the car industry believes today's nuclear family needs for its weekly trip to IKEA.
Once the Midwestern nuclear family is really ready to deal with that reality, we'll all be better off.
Extended kinship ties weaken, lineage patterns dissolve, and a trend towards some form of the conjugal system generally begins to appear--that is, the nuclear family becomes a more independent kinship unit." (3) Goode referred to the "conjugal system" both as an ideal--something people regard as appropriate and right--as well as a reality, something that is empirically observed.
From the meltdown of the nuclear family, a new alternate family has arisen, consisting of friends, work colleagues or siblings keen to move out of the family home, but without the financial resources to go it alone.
A PSYCHOLOGIST yesterday said the breakdown of the nuclear family could be behind the growing trend of parents killing their children and themselves.
* Corpus Callosum (Michael Snow) Existential anxiety goes digital as Snow explodes the boringly secure enclaves of the nuclear family and the office drone.
Not only must we entrench the legal and social privileges that protect and promote the nuclear family. We must prevent politicians and judges from granting spousal privileges to partners who do not commit permanently to each other or, as in homosexual unions, to society's procreational project.
In other words, the shift to marriage as an option may well have given more people the freedom to bail out early, but it has also given many of us the room and incentive to build relationships with significantly more intimacy, flexibility, and mutual satisfaction than was possible under the rigid structure and gender roles of the idealized nuclear family of the '50s.

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