nuclear family


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family

 [fam´ĭ-le]
1. a group of people related by blood or marriage or a strong common bond, such as those descended from a common ancestor, or a husband, wife, and their children.
2. a taxonomic category below an order and above a genus.
blended family a family unit composed of a married couple and their offspring including some from previous marriages.
dysfunctional family one in which adult caregivers are unable to consistently fulfill their family responsibilities.
extended family a nuclear family and their close relatives, such as the children's grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
nuclear family a family consisting of a two-generation relationship of parents and children, living together and more or less isolated from their extended family.
nuclear dyad family a husband and wife with no children.
family of origin the family in which a person grew up.
family processes the psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual functions and relationships within the family unit; for nursing diagnoses, see under process.
single-parent family a lone parent and offspring living together as a family unit.
skewed family a family in which one spouse is severely dysfunctional and the other spouse assumes an acquiescent, peacemaking stance to maintain equilibrium.
family (omaha) in the omaha system, a problem modifier defined as a social unit or related group of individuals who live together and who experience a health-related problem.

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

in genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.

nuclear family

[n(y)o̅o̅′kle·ər]
Etymology: L, nucleus, nut kernel, familia, household
a family unit consisting of the biological parents and their offspring. The nuclear family is a relatively recent product of Western society. The nuclear family unit is less efficient than an extended family unit in providing information and vital services to family members, such as child rearing, child care, and care of older family members. Compare extended family, matrifocal family.

nuclear family

Global village
See Nuclear club.
 
Social medicine
The core family unit which classically consists of heterosexual male and female partners and their direct genetic progeny; disintegration of this unit and its central role in society is held responsible by some for losses in mental equilibrium.

nuclear family

Social medicine The core family unit, which typically consists of heterosexually-oriented ♂and ♀ partners and their direct–usually unmarried genetic progeny. Cf Companionship, Extended family, Marriage bonus, Most significant other, Social isolation. Cf Single-parent family.

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

(nū'klē-ăr fam'i-lē)
In genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.

Nuclear family

The basic family unit, consisting of father, mother, and their biological children.
Mentioned in: Family Therapy

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

(nū'klē-ăr fam'i-lē)
In genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.

nuclear family,

n a family unit consisting of the biologic parents and their offspring. The nuclear family is less inclusive than the extended family. Although the nuclear family is a relatively recent product of Western society, it is threatened by the increasing dissolution of marriage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amazonian men's houses patently co-exist with the nuclear family (Shapiro 2009), but what of Melanesia, where the degree of misogyny is even more profound (Gregor and Tuzin 2001)?
The privileged status of the biological nuclear family in American society contributes to the stigmatization of all nonnuclear families, but especially that of stepfamilies.
The apparent lack of formalized public space in the history of Chinese architecture can be partially explained by this model -- residents talk, cook, eat, wash anti play in these alleyways and form a strong social fabric which extends the nuclear family unit to a network of extended family and neighbours.
We are now faced with the challenges of violence, both in the family and at school; school success being defined as group student achievement rather than appropriately defined individualized achievement standards; and diversity, which reaches beyond cultural, ethnic, and gender definitions to encompass the redefinition of "family" other than the traditional, nuclear family definition.
This reference to "assimilation" subtly introduces the one condition that the report later claims is necessary for overcoming the problem of inequality: the willingness of African Americans to embrace the nuclear family structure as a means of placing them on an equal footing with whites.
Cantor, a University of Virginia professor who won a political science award for his essay "The Simpsons: Atomistic Politics and the Nuclear Family.
Westbury's Midlands regional sales director Christine Harris believes the survey reveals changes in the nuclear family over the past 30 years.
A cursory scan of the relevant legal literature reveals that, to qualify as a religion for tax exemptions, a group should be (a) incorporated and (b) claim a membership larger than a single nuclear family.
And beyond her nuclear family, Lebenthal has the task of juggling family politics at work.
for healthy psychological development, a child must grow up in a nuclear family with a mother and a father.
Only 57 of the societies -- less than half -- specified rules against nuclear family incest, whereas 114 societies designated rules to control mating or marriage with cousins, in-laws or both, Thornhill reports.
In a recent interview with Vision Media titled Beyond the Nuclear Family, researchers Bella DePaulo and Robert Milardo acknowledge that aunts and uncles are virtually invisible in public life despite their importance in the private lives of many families.

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