nuclear family

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Related to nuclear families: Extended families

family

 [fam´ĭ-le]
1. a group of people related by blood or marriage or a strong common bond, such as those descended from a common ancestor, or a husband, wife, and their children.
2. a taxonomic category below an order and above a genus.
blended family a family unit composed of a married couple and their offspring including some from previous marriages.
dysfunctional family one in which adult caregivers are unable to consistently fulfill their family responsibilities.
extended family a nuclear family and their close relatives, such as the children's grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
nuclear family a family consisting of a two-generation relationship of parents and children, living together and more or less isolated from their extended family.
nuclear dyad family a husband and wife with no children.
family of origin the family in which a person grew up.
family processes the psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual functions and relationships within the family unit; for nursing diagnoses, see under process.
single-parent family a lone parent and offspring living together as a family unit.
skewed family a family in which one spouse is severely dysfunctional and the other spouse assumes an acquiescent, peacemaking stance to maintain equilibrium.
family (omaha) in the omaha system, a problem modifier defined as a social unit or related group of individuals who live together and who experience a health-related problem.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

in genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

nuclear family

Global village
See Nuclear club.
 
Social medicine
The core family unit which classically consists of heterosexual male and female partners and their direct genetic progeny; disintegration of this unit and its central role in society is held responsible by some for losses in mental equilibrium.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

nuclear family

Social medicine The core family unit, which typically consists of heterosexually-oriented ♂and ♀ partners and their direct–usually unmarried genetic progeny. Cf Companionship, Extended family, Marriage bonus, Most significant other, Social isolation. Cf Single-parent family.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

(nū'klē-ăr fam'i-lē)
In genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Nuclear family

The basic family unit, consisting of father, mother, and their biological children.
Mentioned in: Family Therapy
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

(nū'klē-ăr fam'i-lē)
In genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The research, conducted last summer in collaboration with Scorpio Partnership, included responses from 1,770 nuclear families, 219 single parents and 274 blended families from the U.S., Canada and the U.K.
1- To examine and compare the scores of the women of joint and nuclear families on perceived stress scale.
4:53 Fatima Suhail: In nuclear families, children are given individual attention and parents can find various ways to help their children socialise, which is absolutely not possible in a joint family system where there is an indirect competition between the family's children.
Among women in nuclear families, having no in-laws was associated with increased odds of hospital delivery (1.7); relationship quality with in-laws was not associated with facility births.
Of the participants, 36 percent were living alone, 18 percent living with a partner only, 21 percent living in nuclear families, 10 per cent in step-families, and 15 percent living in shared houses.
The Breakfast Set conceived by Danica's team of young designers is aimed at "new" nuclear families, students, and singles.
She is concerned, as she explains, with collective fantasies rather than individual case histories that ignore the great differences between modern and early modern households: the putting out of infants, wet nursing, strict hierarchies including servants as well as children, and market labor carried out in large workshop households consisting of a master and his wife, apprentices, and young women workers, rather than nuclear families. At the same time, she recognizes that national identities arise from complex shared fantasies rather than geographical or political fact.
THE SO-CALLED "MORAL MAJORITY" NOW REPRESENTS A MINORITY, IN THAT TRADITIONAL NUCLEAR FAMILIES ACCOUNT FOR ONLY ONE-FOURTH OF ALL U.S.
My fellow Americans we now have evidence that Badmashistan has nuclear families. We'll have to attack these brown evildoers immediately.
This paper suggests that such a finding is misleading, asserting that educational outcomes for both types of children in blended families--stepchildren and their half-siblings who are the joint biological children of both parents--are similar to each other and substantially worse than outcomes for children reared in traditional nuclear families. It concludes that the crucial distinction is between children reared in traditional nuclear families and children reared in other family structures.

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