nuclear family

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Related to nuclear families: Extended families

family

 [fam´ĭ-le]
1. a group of people related by blood or marriage or a strong common bond, such as those descended from a common ancestor, or a husband, wife, and their children.
2. a taxonomic category below an order and above a genus.
blended family a family unit composed of a married couple and their offspring including some from previous marriages.
dysfunctional family one in which adult caregivers are unable to consistently fulfill their family responsibilities.
extended family a nuclear family and their close relatives, such as the children's grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
nuclear family a family consisting of a two-generation relationship of parents and children, living together and more or less isolated from their extended family.
nuclear dyad family a husband and wife with no children.
family of origin the family in which a person grew up.
family processes the psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual functions and relationships within the family unit; for nursing diagnoses, see under process.
single-parent family a lone parent and offspring living together as a family unit.
skewed family a family in which one spouse is severely dysfunctional and the other spouse assumes an acquiescent, peacemaking stance to maintain equilibrium.
family (omaha) in the omaha system, a problem modifier defined as a social unit or related group of individuals who live together and who experience a health-related problem.

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

in genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.

nuclear family

[n(y)o̅o̅′kle·ər]
Etymology: L, nucleus, nut kernel, familia, household
a family unit consisting of the biological parents and their offspring. The nuclear family is a relatively recent product of Western society. The nuclear family unit is less efficient than an extended family unit in providing information and vital services to family members, such as child rearing, child care, and care of older family members. Compare extended family, matrifocal family.

nuclear family

Global village
See Nuclear club.
 
Social medicine
The core family unit which classically consists of heterosexual male and female partners and their direct genetic progeny; disintegration of this unit and its central role in society is held responsible by some for losses in mental equilibrium.

nuclear family

Social medicine The core family unit, which typically consists of heterosexually-oriented ♂and ♀ partners and their direct–usually unmarried genetic progeny. Cf Companionship, Extended family, Marriage bonus, Most significant other, Social isolation. Cf Single-parent family.

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

(nū'klē-ăr fam'i-lē)
In genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.

Nuclear family

The basic family unit, consisting of father, mother, and their biological children.
Mentioned in: Family Therapy

nu·cle·ar fam·i·ly

(nū'klē-ăr fam'i-lē)
In genetics, two parents and their progeny in common.

nuclear family,

n a family unit consisting of the biologic parents and their offspring. The nuclear family is less inclusive than the extended family. Although the nuclear family is a relatively recent product of Western society, it is threatened by the increasing dissolution of marriage.
References in periodicals archive ?
4:53 Fatima Suhail: In nuclear families, children are given individual attention and parents can find various ways to help their children socialise, which is absolutely not possible in a joint family system where there is an indirect competition between the family's children.
Among women in nuclear families, having no in-laws was associated with increased odds of hospital delivery (1.
Factors include an increase in nuclear families, lower average number of members per household and an overall increase in population along with increases in national income and standard of living.
Over the next decade the amount of households containing traditional nuclear families will decrease drastically.
Most people used to live in extended families, comprised of fairly large nuclear families, within a fairly small area.
Researchers say that, on average, children who are reared in nuclear families have the best outcomes.
Whether in the jungles (hobo camps on the road) or in urban lodging districts, the lives of these migratory workers challenged mainstream "beliefs in private nuclear families, moderate domestic consumption, and steady work" (91).
It made us all re-evaluate the meaning of ``family,'' both our nuclear families and the extended family of mankind.
The objectives of Temporary Aid to Needy Families (TANF), the program that replaced Aid to Families with Dependent Children, codified Congress's stance on the supremacy of traditional, nuclear families.
Feasts act as an all-purpose ritual oil that lubricates Aka society's interconnected parts, from struggling nuclear families to powerful coalitions of village chiefs, according to archaeologist Michael Clarke of Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia.
But in an election where the policy promises of 1992 mean nothing and airbrushed photos of nuclear families everything, where else can we look for guidance?
A large young working population with median age of 24 years, nuclear families in urban areas, along with increasing workingwomen population and emerging opportunities in the services sector are going to be the key growth drivers of the organized retail sector in India.

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