nuclear


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nuclear

 [noo´kle-ar]
pertaining to a nucleus.
nuclear magnetic resonance a phenomenon exhibited by many atomic nuclei: when placed in a constant magnetic field, the nuclei absorb electromagnetic radiation at a few characteristic frequencies. By applying an external magnetic field to a solution in a constant radio frequency field, it is possible to determine the structure of an unknown compound. An application of this technique, called magnetic resonance imaging, permits imaging of soft tissues of the body by distinguishing between hydrogen atoms in different environments.
nuclear medicine technologist a health care professional whose duties include positioning and attending to patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures, operating imaging devices (scintillation cameras and rectilinear scanners) under the direction of the nuclear medicine physician, preparing radiopharmaceuticals for administration to patients, making dose calculations for in vivo procedures, performing quality control procedures, and utilizing a knowledge of radiation physics and radiation safety to minimize the radiation exposure to patients, to the technologist and coworkers, and to the public. There are currently three organizations that certify nuclear medicine technologists: the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT), the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP), and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Individuals certified by the ARRT are designated RT(N)(ARRT); those certified by the ASCP are designated NM(ASCP); and those certified by the NMTCB are designated CNMT.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

nu·cle·ar

(nū'klē-ĕr), Avoid the mispronunciation nū'kyu-lar.
Relating to a nucleus, either cellular or atomic; in the latter sense, usually referring to radiation emanating from atomic nuclei (α, β, or γ) or to atomic fission.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

nuclear

(no͞o′klē-ər, nyo͞o′-)
adj.
1. Biology Of, relating to, or forming a nucleus of a cell: a nuclear membrane.
2. Physics
a. Of or relating to atomic nuclei: a nuclear chain reaction.
b. Using or derived from the energy of atomic nuclei: nuclear power.
3. Of, using, or possessing atomic or hydrogen bombs: nuclear war; nuclear nations.
4. Drastic or extreme; radical: "The Senate majority leader ... had vowed to invoke what some have called the nuclear option to do away with judicial filibusters" (Carl Hulse).
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

nu·cle·ar

(nū'klē-ăr)
Relating to a nucleus, either cellular or atomic; in the latter sense, usually referring to radiation emanating from atomic nuclei (α, β, or γ) or to atomic fission.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
He argued that Pakistan was denied access to nuclear technology, whereas in 2008 the US signed a nuclear deal with India and pushed an exemption for India inside the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG).
He said nuclear technologies will bring various economic advantage such as new technological industry platforms, national industrial development, improved regional investment climates, agricultural export growth, new jobs as well as increased life expectancy andimproved quality of life for the Nigerian population.
Jawaharlal Nehru supported the cause of a nuclear test ban and called for a "standstill" agreement in 1954.
By constraining the development of advanced new types of nuclear weapons, the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty puts a brake on the arms race.
Responding to the bill presentation, Gaborone Central legislator, Dr Phenyo Butale stated that even though he supported the prohibition of nuclear weapons, government also needed to invest on the positive use of nuclear energy.
For instance, Asahi Shimbun criticized the Japanese government for prioritizing the "nuclear umbrella" of the United States over the NWPT.
Moreover, the lawmaker said a strong national framework on nuclear power 'must be compliant with international standards on safety, security, safeguards and liability.'
The major US concern is that Moscow believes the country would not respond to the Russian employment of TNWs with strategic nuclear weapons.
What are the determining factors that make nuclear energy more relevant?
States that participate in nuclear alliances, such as NATO, are wantonly complicit in obstructing progress toward nuclear disarmament.
She said Pakistan holds enviable record of being fully responsible towards its international obligations in the sphere of nuclear technology.
On this day in 1998, Pakistan conducted five successful nuclear tests in the north-western Chaghi district of Balochistan in response to continued aggressive posturing by its neighbour, India.