nuclear


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nuclear

 [noo´kle-ar]
pertaining to a nucleus.
nuclear magnetic resonance a phenomenon exhibited by many atomic nuclei: when placed in a constant magnetic field, the nuclei absorb electromagnetic radiation at a few characteristic frequencies. By applying an external magnetic field to a solution in a constant radio frequency field, it is possible to determine the structure of an unknown compound. An application of this technique, called magnetic resonance imaging, permits imaging of soft tissues of the body by distinguishing between hydrogen atoms in different environments.
nuclear medicine technologist a health care professional whose duties include positioning and attending to patients undergoing nuclear medicine procedures, operating imaging devices (scintillation cameras and rectilinear scanners) under the direction of the nuclear medicine physician, preparing radiopharmaceuticals for administration to patients, making dose calculations for in vivo procedures, performing quality control procedures, and utilizing a knowledge of radiation physics and radiation safety to minimize the radiation exposure to patients, to the technologist and coworkers, and to the public. There are currently three organizations that certify nuclear medicine technologists: the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT), the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP), and the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB). Individuals certified by the ARRT are designated RT(N)(ARRT); those certified by the ASCP are designated NM(ASCP); and those certified by the NMTCB are designated CNMT.

nu·cle·ar

(nū'klē-ĕr), Avoid the mispronunciation nū'kyu-lar.
Relating to a nucleus, either cellular or atomic; in the latter sense, usually referring to radiation emanating from atomic nuclei (α, β, or γ) or to atomic fission.

nuclear

/nu·cle·ar/ (noo´kle-ar) pertaining to a nucleus.

nuclear

(no͞o′klē-ər, nyo͞o′-)
adj.
1. Biology Of, relating to, or forming a nucleus of a cell: a nuclear membrane.
2. Physics
a. Of or relating to atomic nuclei: a nuclear chain reaction.
b. Using or derived from the energy of atomic nuclei: nuclear power.
3. Of, using, or possessing atomic or hydrogen bombs: nuclear war; nuclear nations.
4. Drastic or extreme; radical: "The Senate majority leader ... had vowed to invoke what some have called the nuclear option to do away with judicial filibusters" (Carl Hulse).

nu·cle·ar

(nū'klē-ăr)
Relating to a nucleus, either cellular or atomic; in the latter sense, usually referring to radiation emanating from atomic nuclei (α, β, or γ) or to atomic fission.

nuclear

pertaining to a nucleus.

nuclear bag fibers
fibers found in neuromuscular spindles; have an extensive nerve supply.
nuclear chain fibers
fibers, which like nuclear bag fibers, are found in neuromuscular spindles; shorter but more numerous than the bag variety.
nuclear ground substance, nuclear matrix
the matrix substance in a nucleus, surrounded by the limiting membrane.
nuclear imaging
nuclear index
nuclear medicine technologist
see radiological technologist.
nuclear sap
soluble phase of the nuclear matrix.
nuclear veterinary medicine
see nuclear veterinary medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
China is the country with the fastest growth in nuclear power.
It's been 60 years since nuclear weapons have been used in war, but the psychological barriers that have helped limit the potential for the use of nuclear weapons in this country and others seems to be breaking down" says Lawrence M.
The problem is made scarier still by the fact that many of our current facilities are simply in poor geographic locations for storing nuclear materials in a post-9/ll world.
The country's medievalist theocratic leaders, secure behind their nuclear deterrent, would deepen and intensify their support for global terrorism, further destabilize the fragile democracies of Iraq and Afghanistan, bolster their own vulnerable position among Iranians, terrify other nations into a regional nuclear arms race, and seek ways to make good on their promise to annihilate Israel.
So in answer to the question of whether nuclear power makes economic sense, it simply depends--"in some countries it does, in others it does not," says Alan McDonald, a staff expert in planning and economic studies at the IAEA.
Having somehow survived the most violent century in human history and as the only nation to have ever actually used nuclear weapons for their intended and dreadful purpose, let's not place the development of a more user-friendly nuke at the top of the geopolitical agenda for the next century--even one that won't destroy all of God's green creation, just a little piece of it.
The rulemaking started after the NRC met with the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), an industry group, which admitted that many of its members did not have the required safeguards in place.
This touches a nerve in the nuclear power industry," says Stephen Lester, science director of the Center for Health, Environment and Justice (CHEJ).
Nevertheless, "original child" serves as an effective conceit, and in Schonegevel's skilled hands, provides one of the film's central motifs: the strange, unmistakable, morally exigent relationship between children and the dawn of the nuclear age.
During this period there have been no further ratifications of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty by nuclear capable states, including nuclear weapons state parties to the NPT.