nuchal cord


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

nuchal cord

loop(s) of umbilical cord around the fetal neck, posing risk of intrauterine hypoxia, fetal distress, or death.

nuchal cord

[no̅o̅′kəl]
Etymology: Fr, nuque, nape; Gk, chorde
an abnormal but common condition in which the umbilical cord is wrapped around the neck of the fetus in utero or of the baby as it is being born. It is usually possible to slip the loop or loops of cord gently over the child's head. Sometimes it is a single loose loop, and the shoulders may deliver through it. If it is tight, it may be clamped in two places and cut with sterile, blunt tipped scissors. The condition occurs in more than 25% of deliveries, more often with long cords than with short ones.

nuchal cord

A term of art referring to one or more loops of umbilical cord which wrap around the foetus’s neck and cause foetal distress.

nu·chal cord

(nū'kăl kōrd)
Loop(s) of umbilical cord around the fetal neck, posing risk of intrauterine hypoxia, fetal distress, or death.
References in periodicals archive ?
6 neonates from nuchal cord group needed intervention, while 3 from non-nuchal cord group.
In our study nuchal cord group was found to have normal vaginal deliveries 34 (68%), instrumental deliveries 3 (6%), caesarean section rate was 13 (26%).
The presence of a nuchal cord is often cited as a major cause of foetal distress, as evidenced by meconium stained amniotic fluid or foetal bradycardia or tachycardia.
The presence of a nuchal cord is often cited as a major cause of fetal distress, as evidenced by meconium stained amniotic fluid and/or fetal bradycardia or tachycardia 10,13,15.
The present study was unable to demonstrate a significant difference in the mean 1minute Apgar score between the two groups, although the nuchal cord group did tend to have a larger percentage of infants (16.
Doing ceaserian section for solely nuchal cord when perinatal outcome is not affected, will only add additional morbidity to mothers health and increasing rate of section.
The prevalence of nuchal cord in our study was similar to that cited in the literature.
A single nuchal cord loop does not appear to increase the risk of CS or of poor neonatal outcome.
We had insufficient fetal blood gas analyses to obtain meaningful statistical results, and we were unable to determine whether the nuchal cord had a deleterious effect on the obstetric results because the figures obtained were too close to statistical significance.
Anemia did occur more frequently in the nuchal cord group, but the small numbers prevent adequate statistical comparison.
Although not measured in this study, others have shown that the length of the umbilical cord predisposes an infant to a nuchal cord.
The presence of a nuchal cord in this study was not associated with an increased frequency of primary cesarean, vacuum, or forceps deliveries.