novel

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novel

Intellectual property
adjective Referring to that which is new and/or original—i.e., the invention must never have been made in public in any way, anywhere, before the date on which the application for a patent is filed.

Vox populi
noun Fictional prose of book length, the storyline of which has some degree of realism.
References in classic literature ?
It is more needful that I should have a fibre of sympathy connecting me with that vulgar citizen who weighs out my sugar in a vilely assorted cravat and waistcoat, than with the handsomest rascal in red scarf and green feathers--more needful that my heart should swell with loving admiration at some trait of gentle goodness in the faulty people who sit at the same hearth with me, or in the clergyman of my own parish, who is perhaps rather too corpulent and in other respects is not an Oberlin or a Tillotson, than at the deeds of heroes whom I shall never know except by hearsay, or at the sublimest abstract of all clerical graces that was ever conceived by an able novelist.
Denham muttered something, which was indeed all that was required of him, and the novelist went on where he had left off.
My idea is that there's a certain quality of beauty in the past, which the ordinary historical novelist completely ruins by his absurd conventions.
is only necessary to lay a page of some popular novelist alongside a
And that house was always thronged with visitors, invited and uninvited, with friends who came out of love of the genial host, with strangers who came out of curiosity to see the great novelist.
In short, charity must have its romance, as the novelist or playwright must have his.
how some poor unfortunate got up on to a steeple, who had better never have gone up as far as the belfry; and then, having needlessly got him up there, the happy novelist rings the bell for all the world to come together and hear, O dear
However, had that been the case, there would have been no story, as the novelists say, and I trust, as he goes on, the reader may feel with me that that would have been a pity.
Everything, however, passed satisfactorily by a lazy and fascinating transition into the sphere of art, that is, into the beautiful forms of life, lying ready, largely stolen from the poets and novelists and adapted to all sorts of needs and uses.
You do come across these poor wretches now and then, though, to the credit of humanity, they are principally confined to that fearful and wonderful society known only to lady novelists.
If I were to propound Heseltine's theory to you, you would think that he had been reading the works of some of our enterprising young novelists.
The nephew of one of the standard Victorian novelists, Mainhall bobbed about among the various literary cliques of London and its outlying suburbs, careful to lose touch with none of them.