nourishment


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nour·ish·ment

(nŭr'ish-ment),
A substance used to feed or to sustain life and growth of an organism.
Synonym(s): aliment (1)

nourishment

(nûr′ĭsh-mənt)
n.
1.
a. The act of nourishing.
b. The state of being nourished.
2. Something that nourishes; food.

nour·ish·ment

(nŭr'ish-mĕnt)
A substance used to feed or to sustain life and growth of an organism.

nour·ish·ment

(nŭr'ish-mĕnt)
A substance used to feed or to sustain life and growth of an organism.
Synonym(s): aliment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Van Dover, Blankenship, and others agree that deep-sea photosynthetic organisms-if they exist-probably subsist mostly on chemosynthesis and use the light only for supplemental nourishment. But the possibility of photosynthesis in the deep sea has led some scientists to speculate that this process-which ultimately feeds most life on Earth-may have evolved near hydrothermal vents.
She further said, "In coming months our aim is to spread awareness regarding the five mantras of nourishment including the importance of hand wash and a properly balanced diet for living a healthy life and making people understand the importance of mother's milk for the baby." (ANI)
The event, held at Citam, Karen, was full of entertainment and spiritual nourishment.
In the petitions "Give us this day our daily bread," and "Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us" we are praying for nourishment of body and soul.
The child's nourishment health facilities include the provision of latest infants nourishment units.
Studies have shown that the inadequacy of nourishment is causing long-term health-related problems such as stunting and proper brain development among Filipino children.
The commission constituted on the orders of the Lahore High Court (LHC) chief justice (CJ) held the meeting at the park's rest house and discussed and reviewed the physical, geographical, environmental and medical circumstances and effects regarding the breeding and nourishment of blackbuck at the park.
Beginning with a focus on ontology, Pelluchon integrates reflection on the corporeality of the subject and the human condition into a phenomenology of "living from" and of nourishment. Her analysis of the manner in which human beings nourish themselves from their natural and artificial milieu will bring out significations by which to renew or to refresh what most speak of in terms of taste and aesthetics, she says, to redefine the connection between agriculture and culture, and to think about the place of urbanism and architecture.