nostalgia

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nos·tal·gi·a

(nos-tal'jē-ă),
The longing to return home, to a former time in one's life, or to familiar people and surroundings.
[G. nostos, a return (home), + algos, pain]

nos·tal·gi·a

(nos-tal'jē-ă)
The longing to return home, to a former time in one's life, or to familiar people and surroundings.
[G. nostos, a return (home), + algos, pain]

nostalgia

(nŏs-tăl′jē-ă) [Gr. nostos, a return home, + algos, pain]
1. Homesickness; longing to return home.
2. A longing to return to a previously experienced time or place.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Historian Christopher Lasch (1984; also cited in Spitzer, 1999:91 and Vromen, 1994:73), likewise refers to nostalgia a "betrayal of history." Lasch labels "nostalgists" to be no more than "incurable sentimentalists" who cannot bear to "face the truth about the past." Similarly, Iwona Irwin-Zarecka (1989 cited in Vromen, 1994:74-75) describes nostalgia as a "means of conducting a search for the exotic." In her examination of a 1986 National Geographic portrait of the last Jews of Poland, Irwin-Zarecka asserts that what is nostalgically remembered are traditional Jewish rituals and beliefs, strange and mystical.
Hollywood has, for instance, created seriously popular entertainments such as Topkapi (1964, Jules Dassin), How to Steal a Million (1966, William Wyler), The Sting (1973, George Roy Hill) and The Usual Suspects (1995, Bryan Singer), as well as the recent remake of The Italian Job (2003, Gary Gray), which, whatever nostalgists insist, is at least as accomplished as the British original of 1969 (Peter Collinson).
This classic-format blued-steel entry will appeal greatly to handgun nostalgists (like me) and is a great carrying and close-quarters hunting tool for those who prefer a bit more weight than offered by the AirLite PD Model 329.
Nostalgists for the American chestnut tree flocked to Washington, Virginia, this spring to buy seedlings resistant to a blight that has wiped out the species.
They're surly nostalgists, constantly comparing these dismal days to the era when--oh, choose your old-timer--Elgin Baylor took it to the hole or Joltin' Joe roamed the outfield or blah, blah, blah.
The main danger is not that he is surrounded by nostalgists of Nazism or villains with cloven hoofs.
In fact, pure sports nostalgists will probably not like either book.
For all this, as noted by Benjamin Williams, 1855 proved hardly the most propitious year for a work staking its quest after enduring renown on self-advertisement as an epic poem of the South; and during the post-Civil War era it largely sank from view to become an object of appreciation mainly among literary antiquarians and cultural nostalgists. Meek himself died in 1865; and what local reputation he retained became increasingly associated with popular lyrics such as those contained in his 1857 volume, Songs and Poems of the South, and a collection of prose historical sketches and essays, many of them reprinted orations, published in the same year and entitled Romantic Passages in Southwestern History.
The golden age that time travelers revisit bears little resemblance, of course, to any time that ever was; like other nostalgists, they create a past out of a childhood divested of responsibilities and an imagined landscape invested with all they find missing in the modern world (p.25).
Whether such a "mob" of readers existed; whether Pound and Eliot had to leave America for London in order to find a cultural setting, rigidly stratified by class, where poetry was attended to by the upper classes; whether they went to London in order to invent the figment of such a culture; whether contemporary nostalgists are sentimental in imagining some supposed heyday of poetry in America - however you look at these questions, they suggest the way Pound and Eliot generated a powerful sense of social context, an idea of a poetry audience that affected my generation and perhaps later ones too.
Unfortunately, Aquarians and Nostalgists alike are assaulting those who support the sound and commonsense notion that we should judge the quality of education by what and how well children actually learn.
Ever innovative nostalgists, in Kammen's phrase, Americans still celebrate tradition in modes that bespeak progress; the Lincoln robot at Disney World proclaims futurist faith.