nostalgia

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nos·tal·gi·a

(nos-tal'jē-ă),
The longing to return home, to a former time in one's life, or to familiar people and surroundings.
[G. nostos, a return (home), + algos, pain]

nos·tal·gi·a

(nos-tal'jē-ă)
The longing to return home, to a former time in one's life, or to familiar people and surroundings.
[G. nostos, a return (home), + algos, pain]

nostalgia

(nŏs-tăl′jē-ă) [Gr. nostos, a return home, + algos, pain]
1. Homesickness; longing to return home.
2. A longing to return to a previously experienced time or place.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, Aquarians and Nostalgists alike are assaulting those who support the sound and commonsense notion that we should judge the quality of education by what and how well children actually learn.
It shouldn't be too difficult, given the goodwill that they have towards each other, for nostalgists of right and left to agree on a set of policies that would undo much of the damage of the past 30 years.
Of course, don't try telling that to the '90s nostalgists who continue to dictate so many Democrats' election strategies no matter the results.
It is this trajectory towards anti-representational thinking, and the philosophy of Deleuze (Heidegger's true philosophical heir) that is consistently missed in the phenomenological critiques of Cartesianism in science, these nostalgists of the 'things themselves'.
For me, the whole point is in using the past as an inspiration to go somewhere new in the present - a lot of people seem to want to paint us as nostalgists but I really don't think we are.
The whole plot [in Allen's film] is that we are nostalgists, that we can't bear to live in our own time without reaching back and gently massaging this other era and thinking, "Wouldn't it be great if I could have been alive in that moment?
Much in this country needs changing and improving; but we should not become nostalgists promoting a better yesterday.
Much in this country needs changing and improving, but we should not become nostalgists promoting a better yesterday, The Telegraph quoted Green, as saying.
World War II, Preston shows, was not the "good war" of nostalgists.
This had the unintended, if not unexpected, effect of narrowing their audience to little more than just aging nostalgists and liberal college students.
Those engaged in such efforts were by no means a uniform group of conservatives or reactionaries; and there no simple, dichotomous split in the movement between escapist nostalgists and engaged modernizers.