nosology


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Related to nosology: nosologist, nosography

no·sol·o·gy

(nō-sol'ŏ-jē),
The science of classification of diseases.
Synonym(s): nosonomy, nosotaxy
[noso- + G. logos, study]

nosology

/no·sol·o·gy/ (no-sol´ah-je) the science of the classification of diseases.nosolog´ic

nosology

(nō-sŏl′ə-jē, -zŏl′-)
n. pl. nosolo·gies
1. The branch of medicine that deals with the classification of diseases.
2. A classification of diseases.

no′so·log′i·cal (-sə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), no′so·log′ic (-ĭk) adj.
no′so·log′i·cal·ly adv.
no·sol′o·gist n.

nosology

[nōsol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, nosos, disease, logos, science
the science of classifying diseases. See also nomenclature.

nosology

(1) The branch of medical science that deals with orderly relationships among diseases or classifications of disease.
(2) A scientific or theoretical system for classification of disease.
(3) A description of the characteristics of a particular disease or syndrome.

nosology

Informatics The branch of medical science that deals with orderly relationships among or classifications of disease. See Composite clinical data dictionary.

no·sol·o·gy

(nō-sol'ŏ-jē)
1. The science of classification of diseases.
2. Classification of sick people into groups, whatever the criteria for the classification, and agreement as to the boundaries of the groups.
Synonym(s): nosonomy, nosotaxy.
[noso- + G. logos, study]

nosology

The science of the classification of diseases. There have been suggestions that nosology may sometimes be influenced by factors other than the purely terminological and the need for accurate description. If, for instance, most mood disorders are actually a combination of anxiety and depression (see COTHYMIA), it is unsatisfactory to assert that these are two different diseases requiring different drug treatments. From the Greek nosos , disease.

nosology (nō·sˑ·l·jē),

n 1. a list or classification of diseases.
2. the branch of science that deals with the classification of diseases.

nosology

classification of patients into groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
1990; Townsend & Belgrave, 2000) and therapy with these populations (Atwell & Azibo, 1991; The Azibo Nosology, 1998) overwhelmingly indicate that psychological Africanity is a tonic that is curative of psycho-social pathology associated with the identity odyssey of deAfricanization that psychological misorientation is.
A neurogeneticist by training, Hyman hadn't thought much about nosology before taking over at NIMH.
Sixteen years later, in 1968, APA revised the DSM-II nosology to include 182 disorders and 10 classes of disorders described in less than 40 pages (Corcoran & Walsh, 2010; Keely et al.
Central sensitivity syndromes: a new paradigm and group nosology for fibromyalgia and overlapping conditions, and the related issue of disease versus illness.
Wilhelm, Kay "Depression: From Nosology to Global Burden," In Women and Depression, Keyes and Goodman, eds.
Phenomenology and Nosology of Schizophrenia: Historical Review" Otawa: Otawa University Press, The Psychiatric Journal of the University of Ottawa 8: 17-24.
However, it is more difficult to diagnose MS in children and there remains some uncertainty about nosology as paediatric cases unexpectedly have a reduced frequency of affected relatives (Canadian Collaborative Study, George Ebers personal communication); usually early onset in complex traits is associated with greater load of risk factors and greater familial risk.
Contemporary psychodynamic (1) scholars and practitioners have recently proffered another nosology, the Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual (PDM; PDM Task Force, 2006).
No matter how determined the classificatory system of the nosology, nostalgia is confessedly misplaced, and the volitional and the autonomic blur.
Moss 2007) Our nosology, which has emphasized reliability over validity, has not kept pace with evolving scientific research whose progress continues at an increasing pace.
As epidemiologists began documenting that alcoholism frequently co-occurs with other psychiatric conditions, continuing advances in the nosology of the disorder and the instruments used to disentangle the various comorbidities further refined these relationships.