nosology

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Related to nosological: nosologies, nosologists

no·sol·o·gy

(nō-sol'ŏ-jē),
The science of classification of diseases.
Synonym(s): nosonomy, nosotaxy
[noso- + G. logos, study]

nosology

/no·sol·o·gy/ (no-sol´ah-je) the science of the classification of diseases.nosolog´ic

nosology

(nō-sŏl′ə-jē, -zŏl′-)
n. pl. nosolo·gies
1. The branch of medicine that deals with the classification of diseases.
2. A classification of diseases.

no′so·log′i·cal (-sə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), no′so·log′ic (-ĭk) adj.
no′so·log′i·cal·ly adv.
no·sol′o·gist n.

nosology

[nōsol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, nosos, disease, logos, science
the science of classifying diseases. See also nomenclature.

nosology

(1) The branch of medical science that deals with orderly relationships among diseases or classifications of disease.
(2) A scientific or theoretical system for classification of disease.
(3) A description of the characteristics of a particular disease or syndrome.

nosology

Informatics The branch of medical science that deals with orderly relationships among or classifications of disease. See Composite clinical data dictionary.

no·sol·o·gy

(nō-sol'ŏ-jē)
1. The science of classification of diseases.
2. Classification of sick people into groups, whatever the criteria for the classification, and agreement as to the boundaries of the groups.
Synonym(s): nosonomy, nosotaxy.
[noso- + G. logos, study]

nosology

The science of the classification of diseases. There have been suggestions that nosology may sometimes be influenced by factors other than the purely terminological and the need for accurate description. If, for instance, most mood disorders are actually a combination of anxiety and depression (see COTHYMIA), it is unsatisfactory to assert that these are two different diseases requiring different drug treatments. From the Greek nosos , disease.

nosology (nō·sˑ·l·jē),

n 1. a list or classification of diseases.
2. the branch of science that deals with the classification of diseases.

nosology

classification of patients into groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
With historical perspective (Azibo, 1996a), Harrell's supplement to the DSM nosological framework as far back as 1979 is acceptable; in the 1990s and beyond, however, the basing of supplementary offerings in the underlying conceptual universe of the DSM, as Johnson (1993) did, should be seen as undesirable, if not unacceptable.
Beckett offers a tidy, single-gendered alignment of gender and reclamation: this version of hysteria is a mental illness whose nosological categorization was developed by men (Charcot and Freud), rendered aesthetically by Beckett as a male disease (in Murphy, in the catatonic, and in Mr Endon), reclaimed by means of the aesthetic strategies developed by and employed by male artists (surrealism and Beckett), and circumvents the spectacle of hysteria as a constitutive methodology of the disease as it applies to female subjects (Beckett).
The epidemiology of disorders of conduct: Nosological issues and comorbidity.
sup][47] Indeed, the nosological rules of DMS-IV reflect an uncertainty as to whether MDD and GAD represent two separate diagnostic entities.
8 When associated with lymphoma, the dermatosis may appear several years before the diagnosis of malignancy or vice versa, so the association of two pathologies in a possible nosological overview has been stressed.
Case selection was performed according to the diagnosis or set of diagnoses included in the nosological entity under study (Diagnosis1 and Diagnosis2) and based on specific inclusion and exclusion criteria.
When deciding on the timing of vaccination, the volume of medical intervention and selecting vaccine preparation, we should consider the spectrum of sensitization, nosological form and stage of the disease, i.
2010, Psychosis, affective disorders and anxiety in autistic Spectrum disorder : prevalence and nosological considerations, Psychopathology, 43, 8-16.
The angioblastic meningioma: a reappraisal of the nosological problem.
Akathisia is a nosological entity that should be considered in the agitated TBI patient, requiring a specific treatment.
Cyberstalking has emerged as a new form of stalking behavior (Deirmenjian, 1999; Meloy, 2007), despite the fact that nosological issues that differentiate cyberbullying, cyberharassment, and cyberstalking continue to be debated in the literature (Durkin & Patterson, 2011 ; Sheridan & Grant, 2007).