nosocomial pneumonia


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hospital-acquired pneumonia

pneumonia in a patient in a hospital, or hospital-like setting, such as a rehabilitation facility. Often caused by gram-negative or staphylococcal organisms.

nosocomial pneumonia

An infection of lungs–bronchoalveolar unit–in a Pt who has been hospitalized ≥ 48 hrs, and directly attributable to pathogens acquired during the hospital visit Etiology Pseudomonas spp, S aureus, Legionella spp Management 3rd generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides–eg, gentamicin. Cf Community-acquired pneumonia, Nosocomial infection, Reverse isolation.

nosocomial pneumonia

Pneumonia occurring after 48 hours of confinement in a hospital, intensive care unit, or nursing home. It is often the result of infection with gram-negative pathogens or multiply drug-resistant bacteria and includes both ventilator-associated pneumonias and other lower respiratory tract infections. Synonym: healthcare-associated pneumonia
See also: pneumonia
References in periodicals archive ?
Nosocomial pneumonia in the intensive care unit acquired by mechanically ventilated versus nonventilated patients.
Do proton pump inhibitors increase the risk for nosocomial pneumonia in a medical intensive care unit?
[11.] Turkish Thoracic Society Consensus report for the diagnosis and treatment of nosocomial pneumonia in adults Turk Thorac J 2010;10:3-13.
In contrast, both CDI and nonprosthetic SSIs were detected with the same moderate sensitivity (95 percent CI = 0.63-0.67 and 0.620.67), while nosocomial pneumonia, CAUTI, and CLABSI were detected with low sensitivity (<0.60).
[1] Pneumonia can be classified as (a) community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), (b) nosocomial pneumonia (hospital-acquired pneumonia or ventilator-associated pneumonia), and (c) healthcare-associated pneumonia.
Gatell et al., "Incidence, risk, and prognosis factors of nosocomial pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients," American Review of Respiratory Disease, vol.
(23) The requirement for conducting randomized controlled clinical practices with a minimal variation in relation to the need for intensive care services having at their disposal effective protocols for the effective application of oral care and resulting reduction of nosocomial pneumonia. (24) Patients were randomly divided into two groups by the use of a coin toss, where heads were assigned to the intervention and tails to the control group.
Nosocomial pneumonia: a multivariate analysis of risk and prognosis.
Kinetic bed therapy to prevent nosocomial pneumonia in mechanical ventilated patients: A systematic review and meta analysis.