normothermia

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normothermia

 [nor″mo-ther´me-ah]
a normal state of temperature. adj., adj normother´mic.

nor·mo·ther·mi·a

(nōr'mō-ther'mē-ă),
Environmental temperature that does not cause increased or depressed activity of body cells.
[normo- + G. thermē, heat]

normothermia

(nôr′mō-thûr′mē-ə)
n.
A condition of normal body temperature.

nor′mo·ther′mic adj.

nor·mo·ther·mi·a

(nōr'mō-thĕr'mē-ă)
Environmental temperature that does not cause increased or depressed activity of body cells.
[normo- + G. thermē, heat]

normothermia

A body temperature within normal limits. The term is used mainly in contexts in which hypothermia is a possibility or a risk.
References in periodicals archive ?
In normothermic patients, use of a disposable digital thermometer, a TA thermometer, and axillary routes may be acceptable alternatives to an oral temperature route in acutely ill adults not requiring core body temperature measurements.
Advantages of normothermic perfusion over cold storage in liver preservation.
Our search strategy comprised compiling keywords as "Normothermic Perfusion", "OrganOx", "Organ Assist", "Organ Care System", "Graft Rejection", "Graft Survival", and "Liver Transplantation" from all the salient articles and broad literature searches on the given databases.
Saint-Paul et al., "Induction of different types of cell death after normothermic liver ischemia-reperfusion," Transplantation Proceedings, vol.
However, in part because of serious adverse events occurring during cooling, such as septicaemia and ventilator-associated pneumonia, it has been difficult to demonstrate the superiority of moderate hypothermia to conventional normothermic care or targeted temperature management to 36[degrees]C except for hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in newborn infants [3-6].
In contrast, with the goal in transplantation being the opposite with maximum reduction of cell death, the nature and timing of antideath strategies during organ procurement and transplantation becomes complex as we test normothermic and hypothermic perfusion strategies as well as different perfusion solutions with altered buffering capacity to minimize ischemic injury.
Olszewski et al., "Dielectric relaxation of normothermic and hypothermic rat corneas," Bioelectrochemistry, vol.
The grafts from non-heart-beating donors are treated with 25 mg/kg of glycine during normothermic recirculation to decrease reperfusion injury to endothelial cells and parenchymal cells after organ transplantation [55].