normal pressure hydrocephalus


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

nor·mal pres·sure hy·dro·ceph·a·lus

a type of hydrocephalus developing usually in older people, due to failure of cerebrospinal fluid to be absorbed by the pacchionian granulations, and characterized clinically by progressive dementia, unsteady gait, urinary incontinence, and usually, a normal spinal fluid pressure.

normal pressure hydrocephalus

Etymology: L, norma, rule, premere, to press; Gk, hydor, water, kephale, head
a condition in which there is dilation of the ventricles without an increase in intracranial pressure. Classic symptoms are gait disturbance, memory/cognitive problems, and urinary incontinence. Diagnosis is made by lumbar puncture to remove cerebrospinal fluid and by watching to see if any of the symptoms improve.

normal pressure hydrocephalus

A misnomer referring to a condition seen in older adults that consists of low-grade hydrocephalus and intermittently elevated intracranial pressure, usually nocturnal, causing Hakim’s triad of symptoms (gait apraxia, urinary incontinence, dementia).

normal pressure hydrocephalus

Adult hydrocephalus, communicating hydrocephalus, idiopathic hydrocephalus Neurology A form of gradual onset progressive hydrocephalus, which accounts for ±5% of all dementias Etiology Idiopathic, obstruction to CSF flow; CSF is produced normally but not reabsorbed; the brain's ventricles enlarge to accommodate the ↑ volume of CSF; CSF pressure remains normal; it is accompanied by brain atrophy due to compression by the fluid-filled ventricles Risk factors Conditions causing obstruction of CSF–eg, closed head injury, neurosurgery with craniotomy, meningitis, subarachnoid hemorrhage. See Hydrocephalus.

nor·mal pres·sure hy·dro·ceph·a·lus

(nōr'măl presh'ŭr hī'drō-sef'ă-lŭs)
A type of hydrocephalus developing usually in older people, due to failure of cerebrospinal fluid to be absorbed by the pacchionian granulations, and characterized clinically by progressive dementia, unsteady gait, urinary incontinence, and usually, a normal spinal fluid pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Normal pressure hydrocephalus presenting as Othello syndrome: case presentation and review of the literature.
The diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.
Characteristics Sex Male 55% Female 45% Age Mean 36 yrs Range 0-81 yrs Mean Age--Males 36 yrs Mean Age--Females 54 yrs Pediatric (0-18 yrs)--Male 28% Pediatric (0-18 yrs)--Female 0% Adult (18-85 yrs)--Male 72% Adult (18-85 yrs)--Female 100% Signs and Symptoms Adults Headaches 52% Gait disturbances 43% Altered mental status 29% Pediatrics Increased head circumference 38% Etiology Aqueductal stenosis 59% Normal pressure hydrocephalus 17% Tumors 10% Others 14%
Correlation of midbrain diameter and gait disturbance in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.
Prospective evaluation of [18f]-Flutemetamol for amyloid detection in the brain of living subjects with normal pressure hydrocephalus.
Sensitivity and predictive value of occupational and physical therapy assessments in the functional evaluation of patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus.
Characteristics Sex Male 55% Female 45% Age Mean 36 yrs Range 0 - 81 yrs Mean Age - Males 36 yrs Mean Age - Females 54 yrs Pediatric (0-18 yrs) - Male 28% Pediatric (0-18 yrs) - Female 0% Adult (18 - 85 yrs) - Male 72% Adult (18 - 85 yrs) - Female 100% Signs and Symptoms Adults Headaches 52% Gait disturbances 43% Altered mental status 29% Pediatrics increased head circumference 38% Etiology Aqueductal stenosis 59% Normal pressure hydrocephalus 17% Tumors 10% Others 14%
Diagnose idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) by clinical history, brain imaging, physical findings, and physiological criteria.
Abstract: Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is one of the few reversible causes of dementia in older adults and accounts for approximately 6% of all dementias.
Nobody knows how many people actually die from normal pressure hydrocephalus," said Dr.
The article on normal pressure hydrocephalus was misleading and unbalanced ("Excess CSF Can Mimic Parkinson's Disease, Dementia," July 15, 2004, p.