acusis

(redirected from normal hearing)

a·cu·sis

(ă-kū'sis),
The ability to perceive sound normally.
Synonym(s): normal hearing
[G. akousis, hearing]

acusis

(1) Obsolete for the sense of hearing.
(2) The Greek root for hearing, as in presby-acusis.
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References in periodicals archive ?
You are at a noisy, cocktail party and yet your ears can detect normally inaudible sounds made by your friends' muscles as they lean in to dish the latest gossip--but, unlike normal hearing, each of these sounds causes your ears to react in the same way.
In mice, the Beethoven defect is marked by one incorrect letter in the DNA sequence of the Tmc1 gene -- an A instead of a T -- a single error that spells the difference between normal hearing and deafness.
Although tinnitus is not hearing loss, it is a condition that can interfere with normal hearing. Tinnitus is a noise in the ear or ears that occurs without an external source of sound.
Early identification of hearing loss in infants and children is of utmost importance because normal hearing is essential for speech and intellectual development.1 Various age specific subjective and objective audiological tests are being used to evaluate hearing status in children.
He concluded that the group with AHL suffers greater impairment than the average normal hearing population.
In the study, which included 5,239 participants age 50 and older, people with mild hearing loss were almost twice as likely to have clinically significant symptoms of depression than those with normal hearing, while those with severe hearing loss had over four times the odds of having depressive symptoms.
The typical school system tends to overlook the obvious needs of the hard of hearing child because the child can speak intelligibly and wears hearing aids, which are assumed will promote normal hearing. As a result of these assumptions, the child might be disruptive in class due to frustration at not being able to hear in a noisy environment; feel that what they are able to hear is normal; are not aware of or misinterpret what words are spoken; and, are singled out as being slower than their peers because of lack of access to a full and meaningful language.
For the study, Frank Lin, MD, PhD., and his colleagues used information from the ongoing Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging to compare brain changes over time between adults with normal hearing and adults with impaired hearing.
The researchers found that individuals with mild hearing loss were almost twice as likely to have clinically significant symptoms of depression than those with normal hearing. Individuals with severe hearing loss had over four times the odds of having depressive symptoms.
This occurs because the contralateral ear has normal hearing and its performance is satisfactory in favorable listening situations, which are situations in a silent environment and situations in which the sound is incident on the side of the best ear.
Studies on gap detection with normal hearing adult listeners have shown that the lowest gap duration that has been detected for BBN sound was in the range of 2 to 5 millisecond (msec).
Listeners with clinically normal hearing may experience an age-related decline in their ability to understand speech in noisy environments, an ability that is vital for real-world communication.