norepinephrine


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Related to norepinephrine: dopamine, serotonin

norepinephrine

 [nor″ep-ĭ-nef´rin]
a catecholamine that is the neurotransmitter of most sympathetic postganglionic neurons and also of certain tracts in the central nervous system. It is also a neurohormone stored in the chromaffin granules of the adrenal medulla and released in response to sympathetic stimulation, primarily in response to hypotension. It produces vasoconstriction, an increase in heart rate, and elevation of blood pressure. It is administered intravenously in the form of the bitartrate salt as a vasopressor to restore blood pressure in certain cases of acute hypotension and to improve cardiac function during decompensation associated with congestive heart failure or cardiovascular surgery. Called also noradrenaline.

nor·ep·i·neph·rine (NE),

(nōr'ep-i-nef'rin),
A catecholamine hormone the natural form of which is d, although the l form has some activity; the base is considered to be the postganglionic adrenergic mediator, acting on α and β receptors; it is stored in chromaffin granules in the adrenal medulla in much smaller amounts than epinephrine and secreted in response to hypotension and physical stress; in contrast to epinephrine it has little effect on bronchial smooth muscle, metabolic processes, and cardiac output, but has strong vasoconstrictive effects and is used pharmacologically as a vasopressor, primarily as the bitartrate salt.

norepinephrine

(nôr′ĕp-ə-nĕf′rĭn)
n.
A substance, C8H11NO3, both a hormone and neurotransmitter, that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and the nerve endings of the sympathetic nervous system and causes vasoconstriction and increases in heart rate, blood pressure, and the sugar level of the blood. Also called noradrenaline.

nor·ep·i·neph·rine

(nōr'ep-i-nef'rin)
A catecholamine hormone, acting on α- and β-receptors; it is stored in chromaffin granules in the medulla of suprarenal gland in much smaller amounts than epinephrine and secreted in response to hypotension and physical stress; used pharmacologically as a vasopressor.
Synonym(s): noradrenaline.

Norepinephrine

Norepinephrine is a hormone secreted by certain nerve endings of the sympathetic nervous system, and by the medulla (center) of the adrenal glands. Its primary function is to help maintain a constant blood pressure by stimulating certain blood vessels to constrict when the blood pressure falls below normal.

noradrenaline (norepinephrine)

A neurohumoral transmitter for most postganglionic sympathetic fibres. It is produced with adrenaline (epinephrine) in the adrenal medulla. It is a powerful excitator of α-adrenergic receptors. See adrenaline (epinephrine); adrenergic receptors; mydriatic; neurotransmitter.

nor·ep·i·neph·rine

(nōr'ep-i-nef'rin)
Catecholamine hormone with strong vasoconstrictive effects; used pharmacologically as a vasopressor, primarily as the bitartrate salt.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a case report by Zeiler et al, (15) 2 patients with aSAH demonstrated worsening neurological examination after norepinephrine was initiated to treat delayed cerebral ischemia and then showed neurologic improvement as soon as norepinephrine was discontinued.
In the more recent research, Segal and her colleagues discovered that levels of salivary alpha amylase, a biomarker that reflects norepinephrine activity in the brain, significantly increased in participants after exercise.
Clonidine, an [alpha]-2 adrenergic agonist, decreases norepinephrine and has been found to reduce hot flushes.
Droxidopa is a synthetic catecholamine that is directly converted to norepinephrine (NE) via decarboxylation, resulting in increased levels of NE in the nervous system, both centrally and peripherally.
Growing observational evidence among Intensivist indicate that norepinephrine compared to dopamine may be associated with better outcomes.
At the Baker Medical Research Institute in Australia, the method was introduced to characterize sympathetic nerve function and central nervous system turnover of norepinephrine in depression, heart failure, hypertension, panic disorder, and obesity (4).
When norepinephrine increases, QseC alerts a response regulator called "QseB" inside the bacterial cell.
Results: The levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine were significantly higher in patients than in normal controls and decreased under propranolol.
In Japan, Dops, which is a precursor of norepinephrine, is currently available for the treatment of frozen gait and dizziness associated with Parkinson's disease, and vertigo, dizziness and fatigue associated with orthostatic hypotension in hemodialysis patients.
Effexor, Cymbalta, and Remeron, a newer group of antidepressants, boost brain levels of serotonin and norepinephrine, like the tricyclics.
The patient received intensive supportive care including dopamine and norepinephrine. After improvement, the patient was extubated on May 9.
Three neurotransmitters in particular--serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine--have been most studied in terms of their role in mood disorders.