nonviable fetus

nonviable fetus

Obstetrics An expelled or delivered fetus which, although living, cannot possibly survive to the point of sustaining life independently, even with support of the best available medical therapy. See Viable Infant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, aborting a nonviable fetus is not a justification.
Further, he finds that removal of a nonviable fetus from the fallopian tube is not theologically different from its removal from the uterus, which is condemned as abortion.
53) In its place, the plurality adopted the undue-burden standard, under which a state regulation seeking to protect fetal life is unconstitutional if it has "the purpose or effect of placing a substantial obstacle in the path of a woman seeking an abortion of a nonviable fetus.
Cause of action for wrongful death of nonviable fetus.
The Texas Tribune's Becca Aaronson reports that Yeakel ruled "that a provision of House Bill 2 that requires doctors performing abortions to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of the abortion facility 'places a substantial obstacle in the path of a woman seeking an abortion of a nonviable fetus and is thus an undue burden to her.
There is an increased incidence of serious maternal morbidity in these pregnancies, such as preeclampsia, dystocia, postpartum hemorrhage due to large placenta, and the psychological burden of carrying a nonviable fetus to term.
Ultrasonography confirmed a nonviable fetus, and products of conception were surgically evacuated.
Methodist theological ethicist Paul Ramsey suggested ways to justify causing the death of an unborn nonviable fetus either as a direct but justifiable action or as an indirect result of an intervention to save the mother's life (assuming both will die), by construing the fetus as a type of an involuntary aggressor.
A famous German moralist proposed that a doctor could accelerate the birth of a nonviable fetus, but the Holy Office also decided that such a teaching could not safely be followed.
70) The court rejected the defendant's equal protection challenge to the state feticide law, finding that the statute did "not violate the Fourteenth Amendment by failing to distinguish between a viable and nonviable fetus.
109) Answering the defendant's contention that the statute was unconstitutionally vague for not distinguishing between a viable and nonviable fetus, the Texas court stated, "The Texas legislature .
Based on the legislative history, the appellate court held that the statute allowed a cause of action for the loss of a viable or nonviable fetus in the mother's body, but did not allow a cause of action for the loss of an embryo created by IVF that had not been implanted into the mother, and remanded the case to the circuit court.