nonverbal


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non·ver·bal

(non-ver'bĕl),
Denoting communication without words, for example, by signs, symbols, facial expressions, gestures, posture.

nonverbal

(nŏn-vûr′bəl)
adj.
Involving little or no use of words: a nonverbal intelligence test.
References in periodicals archive ?
11) Nonverbal communication can help the clinician to distinguish patients who are unwilling to take medication from those who are willing but unable to do so.
When our nonverbal signals conflict with our verbal statements, we send mixed messages.
Clinicians wishing to employ the behaviors of immediacy should explore both verbal and nonverbal techniques and ways to ensure their congruence.
Indeed, this nonverbal disruption of years of primarily verbal and text-based communication is changing not only how we prepare, but also how we present our cases in court.
Joe Navarro, former FBI counterintelligence special agent and expert on nonverbal cues, emphasizes the importance of establishing a baseline while interviewing potential suspects.
Linked to the idea of (learned) display rules in the context of emotional expressions, it can also be assumed that nonverbal behavior might simply be the result of a learning process, without a player experiencing specific emotions.
People define nonverbal intelligence differently, but it's not just about body language.
This interdisciplinary volume on nonverbal behavior research, edited by Lausberg, introduces the NEUROGES coding system to clearly parameterize studied behavior.
The data clearly show that what teachers do is as important inas what they say, and that there is no direct relationship between verbal and nonverbal influence".
Since the access of people with visual impairments to the nonverbal context of communication is limited to what can be perceived through senses other than vision, their understanding of spoken messages may differ considerably from what speakers actually intend to communicate and what other listeners infer on a given occasion.
Nonverbal language, according to major authors such as Shannon, Weaver (1948, 1949), Argyle (1988), Meharabian (1972), Watzlawick (1967), Hall (1966), Jackobson (1956), Ekman and Friesen (2007), has its own epistemological framework where the message is empirically investigated in its essence.
The authors said that in summary, our results support a causal relationship of breastfeeding in infancy with receptive language at age 3 and with verbal and nonverbal IQ at school age.